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Career and Education Opportunities for Petroleum Refinery Workers in Wisconsin

Wisconsin has a population of 5,654,774, which has grown by 5.43% over the past 10 years. Nicknamed the "Badger State," its capital is Madison, though its most populous city is Milwaukee.

The national trend for petroleum refinery workers sees this job pool shrinking by about 15.2% over the next eight years. Petroleum refinery workers generally control the operation of petroleum refining or processing units.

A person working as a petroleum refinery worker can expect to earn about $15 hourly or $31,950 per year on average in Wisconsin and about $26 hourly or $55,010 yearly on average in the U.S. as a whole. Earnings for petroleum refinery workers are not quite as good as earnings in the general category of Chemical and Gas in Wisconsin and better than general Chemical and Gas category earnings nationally.

In 2008, there were a total of 3,619,782 jobs in Wisconsin. The average annual income was $37,770 in 2008, up from $36,990 in 2007. The unemployment rate in Wisconsin was 8.5% in 2009, which has grown by 3.7% since the previous year. Roughly 22.4% of Wisconsin residents have college degrees, which is lower than the national average.

The top industries in Wisconsin include dairy product manufacturing, cheese manufacturing, and converted paper product manufacturing. Notable tourist destinations include the Discovery World, the America's Black Holocaust Museum Inc, and the Betty Brinn Children's Museum.

CITIES WITH Petroleum Refinery Worker OPPORTUNITIES IN Wisconsin


JOB DESCRIPTION: Petroleum Refinery Worker

Petroleum Refinery Worker video from the State of New Jersey Dept. of Labor and Workforce Development

In general, petroleum refinery workers control the operation of petroleum refining or processing units. They also may specialize in controlling manifold and pumping systems, gauging or testing oil in storage tanks, or regulating the flow of oil into pipelines.

Every day, petroleum refinery workers are expected to be able to imediately see the relationships between collections of numbers, images, and patterns. They need to evaluate problems as they arise.

Similar jobs with educational opportunities in Wisconsin include:

  • Bindery Worker. Set up or operate binding machines that produce books and other printed materials.
  • Chemical Plant Operations Technician. Control or operate an entire chemical process or system of machines.
  • Gas Plant Operator. Distribute or process gas for utility companies and others by controlling compressors to maintain specified pressures on main pipelines.
  • Mold Machine Operator. Set up, operate, or tend metal or plastic molding, casting, or coremaking machines to mold or cast metal or thermoplastic parts or products.
  • Power Plant Operator. Control, operate, or maintain machinery to generate electric power. Includes auxiliary equipment operators.
  • Sewage Treatment Plant Operator. Operate or control an entire process or system of machines, often through the use of control boards, to transfer or treat water or liquid waste.

LOCATION INFORMATION: Wisconsin

Wisconsin
Wisconsin photo by KKNiteOwl

Wisconsin has a population of 5,654,774, which has grown by 5.43% in the last 10 years. Nicknamed the "Badger State," its capital is Madison, though its biggest city is Milwaukee. In 2008, there were a total of 3,619,782 jobs in Wisconsin. The average annual income was $37,770 in 2008, up from $36,990 the previous year. The unemployment rate in Wisconsin was 8.5% in 2009, which has grown by 3.7% since the previous year. Roughly 22.4% of Wisconsin residents have college degrees, which is lower than the national average.

The top industries in Wisconsin include dairy product manufacturing, cheese manufacturing, and converted paper product manufacturing. Notable tourist destinations include the Charles Allis Art Museum, the Eisner Museum of Advertising & Design, and the Betty Brinn Children's Museum.