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Career and Education Opportunities for Mail Clerks in Wisconsin

Wisconsin has a population of 5,654,774, which has grown by 5.43% over the past decade. Nicknamed the "Badger State," its capital is Madison, though its most populous city is Milwaukee.

About 3,900 people are currently employed as mail clerks in Wisconsin. By 2016, this is expected to shrink by 11% to 3,460 people employed. This is better than the national trend for mail clerks, which sees this job pool shrinking by about 11.8% over the next eight years. In general, mail clerks prepare incoming and outgoing mail for distribution.

The income of a mail clerk is about $12 per hour or $25,340 annually on average in Wisconsin. In the U.S. as a whole, their income is about $12 per hour or $25,100 annually on average. Compared with people working in the overall category of Postal, people working as mail clerks in Wisconsin earn less. They earn less than people working in the overall category of Postal nationally.

In 2008, there were a total of 3,619,782 jobs in Wisconsin. The average annual income was $37,770 in 2008, up from $36,990 in 2007. The unemployment rate in Wisconsin was 8.5% in 2009, which has grown by 3.7% since the previous year. Approximately 22.4% of Wisconsin residents have college degrees, which is lower than the national average.

The top industries in Wisconsin include dairy product manufacturing, cheese manufacturing, and converted paper product manufacturing. Notable tourist attractions include the A Hotcakes Gallery, the Charles Allis Art Museum, and the Betty Brinn Children's Museum.

CITIES WITH Mail Clerk OPPORTUNITIES IN Wisconsin


JOB DESCRIPTION: Mail Clerk

In general, mail clerks prepare incoming and outgoing mail for distribution. They also use hand or mail handling machines to time stamp, open, and route incoming mail; and address, seal, and affix postage to outgoing mail or packages.

Every day, mail clerks are expected to be able to see details at a very fine level of focus. They need to articulate ideas and problems. It is also important that they listen to and understand others in meetings.

Similar jobs with educational opportunities in Wisconsin include:

  • File Clerk. File correspondence, cards, and other records in alphabetical or numerical order or according to the filing system used. Locate and remove material from file when requested.
  • Mail Carrier and Clerk. Sort mail for delivery. Deliver mail on established route by vehicle or on foot.
  • Office Machine Operator. Operate one or more of a variety of office machines, such as photocopying, photographic, and duplicating machines, or other office machines.
  • Order Filler. Fill customers' mail and telephone orders from stored merchandise in accordance with specifications on sales slips or order forms. Duties include computing prices of items, completing order receipts, keeping records of out-going orders, and requisitioning additional materials, supplies, and equipment.
  • Payroll Bookkeeper. Compile and post employee time and payroll data. May compute employees' time worked, production, and commission. May compute and post wages and deductions. May prepare paychecks.
  • Postal Clerk. Perform any combination of tasks in a post office, such as receive letters and parcels; sell postage and revenue stamps, postal cards, and stamped envelopes; fill out and sell money orders; place mail in pigeon holes of mail rack or in bags according to State, address, or other scheme; and examine mail for correct postage.
  • Postal Service Mail Sorter Operator. Prepare incoming and outgoing mail for distribution. Examine, sort, and route mail by State, type of mail, or other scheme. Load, operate, and occasionally adjust and repair mail processing, sorting, and canceling machinery. Keep records of shipments, pouches, and sacks; and other duties related to mail handling within the postal service. Must complete a competitive exam.
  • Procurement Clerk. Compile information and records to draw up purchase orders for procurement of materials and services.
  • Production Proofreader. Read transcript or proof type setup to detect and mark for correction any grammatical, typographical, or compositional errors.
  • Shipping and Receiving Clerk. Verify and keep records on incoming and outgoing shipments. Prepare items for shipment. Duties include assembling, addressing, and shipping merchandise or material; receiving, unpacking, verifying and recording incoming merchandise or material; and arranging for the transportation of products.
  • Statement Clerk. Prepare and distribute bank statements to customers, answer inquiries, and reconcile discrepancies in records and accounts.
  • Weighter. Weigh, measure, and check materials, supplies, and equipment for the purpose of keeping relevant records. Duties are primarily clerical by nature.

LOCATION INFORMATION: Wisconsin

Wisconsin
Wisconsin photo by KKNiteOwl

Wisconsin has a population of 5,654,774, which has grown by 5.43% in the last 10 years. Nicknamed the "Badger State," its capital is Madison, though its biggest city is Milwaukee. In 2008, there were a total of 3,619,782 jobs in Wisconsin. The average annual income was $37,770 in 2008, up from $36,990 the previous year. The unemployment rate in Wisconsin was 8.5% in 2009, which has grown by 3.7% since the previous year. Roughly 22.4% of Wisconsin residents have college degrees, which is lower than the national average.

The top industries in Wisconsin include dairy product manufacturing, cheese manufacturing, and converted paper product manufacturing. Notable tourist destinations include the Charles Allis Art Museum, the Eisner Museum of Advertising & Design, and the Betty Brinn Children's Museum.