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Career and Education Opportunities for Medical Equipment Repairers in Milwaukee, Wisconsin

Milwaukee, Wisconsin provides a wide variety of opportunities, both career and educational, for medical equipment repairers. Currently, 690 people work as medical equipment repairers in Wisconsin. This is expected to grow 24% to 860 people by 2016. This is not quite as good as the nation as a whole, where employment opportunities for medical equipment repairers are expected to grow by about 27.2%. Medical equipment repairers generally test, adjust, or repair biomedical or electromedical equipment.

Income for medical equipment repairers is about $23 per hour or $48,250 yearly on average in Wisconsin. Nationally, their income is about $19 hourly or $41,520 annually. Earnings for medical equipment repairers are better than earnings in the general category of Specialized Equipment in Wisconsin and better than general Specialized Equipment category earnings nationally.

There are thirty-nine schools of higher education in the Milwaukee area, including one within twenty-five miles of Milwaukee where you can get a degree to start your career as a medical equipment repairer. Medical equipment repairers usually hold an Associate's, or other 2-year degree, so it will take about two years to learn to be a medical equipment repairer if you already have a high school diploma.

CAREER DESCRIPTION: Medical Equipment Repairer

Medical Equipment Repairer video from the State of New Jersey Dept. of Labor and Workforce Development

In general, medical equipment repairers test, adjust, or repair biomedical or electromedical equipment.

Medical equipment repairers examine and test malfunctioning medical and related equipment following manufacturers' specifications, using test and analysis instruments. They also disassemble malfunctioning equipment and remove, repair and replace faulty parts such as motors, clutches or transformers. Equally important, medical equipment repairers have to solder loose connections, using soldering iron. They are often called upon to test and calibrate parts and equipment following manufacturers' manuals and troubleshooting techniques, using hand tools, power tools and measuring devices. They are expected to perform preventive maintenance or service such as cleaning, lubricating and adjusting equipment. Finally, medical equipment repairers test and classify excess or in-use medical equipment and decide on serviceability, condition, and disposition in accordance with regulations.

Every day, medical equipment repairers are expected to be able to read and understand documents and reports. They need to visualize how things come together and can be organized. It is also important that they see details at a very fine level of focus.

It is important for medical equipment repairers to formulate and carry out work assignments, using blueprints, schematic drawings, technical manuals, wiring diagrams, and liquid and air flow sheets, following prescribed regulations and other instructions as required. They are often called upon to contribute expertise to evolve medical maintenance standard operating procedures. They also repair shop equipment and hospital equipment, including welding broken parts and replacing missing parts, or bring item into local shop for major fixes. They are sometimes expected to fabricate or substitute parts or major new items to modify apparatus to meet unique operational or research needs, working from job orders, sketches, modification orders, samples or discussions with operating officials. Somewhat less frequently, medical equipment repairers are also expected to supervise and advise subordinate personnel.

Medical equipment repairers sometimes are asked to compute power and space requirements for installing medical, dental or related equipment and install units to manufacturers' specifications. And finally, they sometimes have to examine and test malfunctioning medical and related equipment following manufacturers' specifications, using test and analysis instruments.

Like many other jobs, medical equipment repairers must be thorough and dependable and be reliable.

Similar jobs with educational opportunities in Milwaukee include:

  • Auto Body Mechanic. Repair and refinish automotive vehicle bodies and straighten vehicle frames.
  • Camera Repair Technician. Repair and adjust cameras and photographic equipment, including commercial video and motion picture camera equipment.
  • Household Appliance Repairer. Repair, adjust, or install all types of electric or gas household appliances, such as refrigerators, washers, and ovens.
  • Industrial Machinery Mechanic. Repair, install, or maintain industrial production and processing machinery or refinery and pipeline distribution systems.
  • Machine Repairman. Lubricate machinery, change parts, or perform other routine machinery maintenance.
  • Mechanical Door Repairer. Install, service, or repair opening and closing mechanisms of automatic doors and hydraulic door closers. Includes garage door mechanics.
  • Millwright. Install, dismantle, or move machinery and heavy equipment according to layout plans, blueprints, or other drawings.
  • Vending Machine Mechanic. Install, service, or repair coin, vending, or amusement machines including video games, juke boxes, or slot machines.

EDUCATIONAL OPPORTUNITIES: Medical Equipment Repairer Training

Milwaukee Area Technical College - Milwaukee, WI

Milwaukee Area Technical College, 700 W State St, Milwaukee, WI 53233-1443. Milwaukee Area Technical College is a large college located in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. It is a public school with primarily 2-year programs. It has 18,780 students and an admission rate of 54%. Milwaukee Area Technical College has an associate's degree program in Biomedical Technology/Technician.

LOCATION INFORMATION: Milwaukee, Wisconsin

Milwaukee, Wisconsin
Milwaukee, Wisconsin photo by Towpilot

Milwaukee is located in Milwaukee County, Wisconsin. It has a population of over 604,477, which has grown by 1.3% over the last ten years. The cost of living index in Milwaukee, 87, is well below the national average. New single-family homes in Milwaukee cost $167,400 on average, which is far less than the state average. In 2008, ninety-six new homes were built in Milwaukee, down from one hundred sixty-seven the previous year.

The three most popular industries for women in Milwaukee are health care, educational services, and finance and insurance. For men, it is administrative and support and waste management services, construction, and accommodation and food services. The average travel time to work is about 23 minutes. More than 18.3% of Milwaukee residents have a bachelor's degree, which is lower than the state average. The percentage of residents with a graduate degree, 6.0%, is lower than the state average.

The unemployment rate in Milwaukee is 10.6%, which is greater than Wisconsin's average of 7.7%.

The percentage of Milwaukee residents that are affiliated with a religious congregation, 47.5%, is less than both the national and state average. Church of the Epiphany, Saint Mark African Methodist Episcopal Church and German Full Gospel Church are among the churches located in Milwaukee. The largest religious groups are the Catholic Church, the Lutheran Church and the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America.

Milwaukee is home to the Caroline Hall and the Wood as well as Cannon Park and Fifth Ward Playground. Shopping malls in the area include Juneau Village Shopping Center, Times Square Shopping Center and Grand Avenue Mall Shopping Center. Visitors to Milwaukee can choose from Edge-O-Town Motel, Manor House Hotel and Days Inn West Allis for temporary stays in the area.