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Career and Education Opportunities for Chief Executive Officers in Wisconsin

Wisconsin has a population of 5,654,774, which has grown by 5.43% over the past 10 years. Nicknamed the "Badger State," its capital is Madison, though its largest city is Milwaukee.

There are currently 5,580 working chief executive officers in Wisconsin; this should shrink by 2% to 5,490 working chief executive officers in the state by 2016. This is not quite as good as the national trend for chief executive officers, which sees this job pool shrinking by about 1.4% over the next eight years. Chief executive officers generally determine and formulate policies and provide the overall direction of companies or private and public sector organizations within the guidelines set up by a board of directors or similar governing body.

A person working as a chief executive officer can expect to earn about $72 per hour or $151,610 yearly on average in Wisconsin and about $76 per hour or $158,560 per year on average in the U.S. as a whole. Incomes for chief executive officers are better than in the overall category of Computer and Operations in Wisconsin, and better than the overall Computer and Operations category nationally. Jobs in this field include: foreign service officer, highway commissioner, and classification and treatment director.

In 2008, there were a total of 3,619,782 jobs in Wisconsin. The average annual income was $37,770 in 2008, up from $36,990 the previous year. The unemployment rate in Wisconsin was 8.5% in 2009, which has grown by 3.7% since the previous year. Roughly 22.4% of Wisconsin residents have college degrees, which is lower than the national average.

The top industries in Wisconsin include dairy product manufacturing, cheese manufacturing, and converted paper product manufacturing. Notable tourist attractions include the A Hotcakes Gallery, the Charles Allis Art Museum, and the CAPT Frederick Pabst Mansion.

CITIES WITH Chief Executive Officer OPPORTUNITIES IN Wisconsin


JOB DESCRIPTION: Chief Executive Officer

In general, chief executive officers determine and formulate policies and provide the overall direction of companies or private and public sector organizations within the guidelines set up by a board of directors or similar governing body. They also plan, direct, or coordinate operational activities at the highest level of management with the help of subordinate executives and staff managers.

Every day, chief executive officers are expected to be able to speak clearly. They need to think through problems and come up with general rules. It is also important that they piece together evidence to, in some sense, diagnose what is going on in a situation.

Similar jobs with educational opportunities in Wisconsin include:

  • Academic Director. Plan, direct, or coordinate research, instructional, student administration and services, and other educational activities at postsecondary institutions, including universities, and junior and community colleges.
  • Administrator. Plan, direct, or coordinate supportive services of an organization, such as recordkeeping, mail distribution, telephone operator/receptionist, and other office support services. May oversee facilities planning and maintenance and custodial operations.
  • Business Administrator. Plan, direct, or coordinate the operations of companies or public and private sector organizations. Duties and responsibilities include formulating policies, managing daily operations, and planning the use of materials and human resources, but are too diverse and general in nature to be classified in any one functional area of management or administration, such as personnel, purchasing, or administrative services. Includes owners and managers who head small business establishments whose duties are primarily managerial.
  • Comptroller. Direct financial activities, such as planning, procurement, and investments for all or part of an organization.
  • Computer Operations Manager. Plan, direct, or coordinate activities in such fields as electronic data processing, information systems, and computer programming.
  • Food Service Manager. Plan, direct, or coordinate activities of an organization or department that serves food and beverages.
  • Human Relations Manager. Plan, direct, and coordinate human resource management activities of an organization to maximize the strategic use of human resources and maintain functions such as employee compensation, recruitment, and regulatory compliance.
  • Industrial Production Manager. Plan, direct, or coordinate the work activities and resources necessary for manufacturing products in accordance with cost, quality, and quantity specifications.
  • Marketing Manager. Determine the demand for products and services offered by a firm and its competitors and identify potential customers. Develop pricing strategies with the goal of maximizing the firm's profits or share of the market while ensuring the firm's customers are satisfied. Oversee product development or monitor trends that indicate the need for new products and services.
  • Natural Resources Specialist. Plan, direct, or coordinate activities in such fields as life sciences, physical sciences, and research and development in these fields.
  • Postmaster. Direct and coordinate operational, administrative, and supportive services of a U.S. post office; or coordinate activities of workers engaged in postal and related work in assigned post office.
  • Shipping Receiving Manager. Plan, direct, and coordinate the storage and distribution operations within an organization or the activities of organizations that are engaged in storing and distributing materials and products.

LOCATION INFORMATION: Wisconsin

Wisconsin
Wisconsin photo by KKNiteOwl

Wisconsin has a population of 5,654,774, which has grown by 5.43% in the last 10 years. Nicknamed the "Badger State," its capital is Madison, though its biggest city is Milwaukee. In 2008, there were a total of 3,619,782 jobs in Wisconsin. The average annual income was $37,770 in 2008, up from $36,990 the previous year. The unemployment rate in Wisconsin was 8.5% in 2009, which has grown by 3.7% since the previous year. Roughly 22.4% of Wisconsin residents have college degrees, which is lower than the national average.

The top industries in Wisconsin include dairy product manufacturing, cheese manufacturing, and converted paper product manufacturing. Notable tourist destinations include the Charles Allis Art Museum, the Eisner Museum of Advertising & Design, and the Betty Brinn Children's Museum.