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Career and Education Opportunities for Administrative Law Judges in Wisconsin

Wisconsin has a population of 5,654,774, which has grown by 5.43% in the last 10 years. Nicknamed the "Badger State," its capital is Madison, though its most populous city is Milwaukee.

The national trend for administrative law judges sees this job pool growing by about 8.0% over the next eight years. In general, administrative law judges conduct hearings to decide or recommend decisions on claims concerning government programs or other government-related matters and prepare decisions.

A person working as an administrative law judge can expect to earn about $43 hourly or $90,890 annually on average in Wisconsin and about $36 hourly or $76,940 yearly on average in the U.S. as a whole. Incomes for administrative law judges are better than in the overall category of Arbitration in Wisconsin, and not quite as good as the overall Arbitration category nationally. Jobs in this field include: social services analyst, county ordinary, and veteran appeals reviewer.

In 2008, there were a total of 3,619,782 jobs in Wisconsin. The average annual income was $37,770 in 2008, up from $36,990 in 2007. The unemployment rate in Wisconsin was 8.5% in 2009, which has grown by 3.7% since the previous year. Roughly 22.4% of Wisconsin residents have college degrees, which is lower than the national average.

The top industries in Wisconsin include dairy product manufacturing, cheese manufacturing, and converted paper product manufacturing. Notable tourist destinations include the Betty Brinn Children's Museum, the Discovery World, and the America's Black Holocaust Museum Inc.

CITIES WITH Administrative Law Judge OPPORTUNITIES IN Wisconsin


JOB DESCRIPTION: Administrative Law Judge

In general, administrative law judges conduct hearings to decide or recommend decisions on claims concerning government programs or other government-related matters and prepare decisions. They also determine penalties or the existence and the amount of liability, or recommend the acceptance or rejection of claims, or compromise settlements.

Every day, administrative law judges are expected to be able to read and understand documents and reports. They need to articulate ideas and problems. It is also important that they speak clearly.

Similar jobs with educational opportunities in Wisconsin include:

  • Arbitrator. Facilitate negotiation and conflict resolution through dialogue. Resolve conflicts outside of the court system by mutual consent of parties involved.
  • Judge. Arbitrate, advise, or administer justice in a court of law. May sentence defendant in criminal cases according to government statutes. May determine liability of defendant in civil cases. May issue marriage licenses and perform wedding ceremonies.
  • Lawyer. Represent clients in criminal and civil litigation and other legal proceedings, draw up legal documents, and manage or advise clients on legal transactions. May specialize in a single area or may practice broadly in many areas of law.
  • Title Examiner. Search real estate records, examine titles, or summarize pertinent legal or insurance details for a variety of purposes. May compile lists of mortgages, contracts, and other instruments pertaining to titles by searching public and private records for law firms, real estate agencies, or title insurance companies.

LOCATION INFORMATION: Wisconsin

Wisconsin
Wisconsin photo by KKNiteOwl

Wisconsin has a population of 5,654,774, which has grown by 5.43% in the last 10 years. Nicknamed the "Badger State," its capital is Madison, though its biggest city is Milwaukee. In 2008, there were a total of 3,619,782 jobs in Wisconsin. The average annual income was $37,770 in 2008, up from $36,990 the previous year. The unemployment rate in Wisconsin was 8.5% in 2009, which has grown by 3.7% since the previous year. Roughly 22.4% of Wisconsin residents have college degrees, which is lower than the national average.

The top industries in Wisconsin include dairy product manufacturing, cheese manufacturing, and converted paper product manufacturing. Notable tourist destinations include the Charles Allis Art Museum, the Eisner Museum of Advertising & Design, and the Betty Brinn Children's Museum.