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Career and Education Opportunities for Technical Writers in Wisconsin

Wisconsin has a population of 5,654,774, which has grown by 5.43% over the past decade. Nicknamed the "Badger State," its capital is Madison, though its biggest city is Milwaukee.

There are currently 730 jobs for technical writers in Wisconsin and this is projected to grow 10% to 810 jobs by 2016. This is not quite as good as the nation as a whole, where employment opportunities for technical writers are expected to grow by about 18.2%. Technical writers generally write technical materials, such as equipment manuals, appendices, or operating and maintenance instructions.

A person working as a technical writer can expect to earn about $25 hourly or $52,790 annually on average in Wisconsin and about $29 hourly or $61,620 yearly on average in the U.S. as a whole. Incomes for technical writers are better than in the overall category of Writing and Editing in Wisconsin, and better than the overall Writing and Editing category nationally. Jobs in this field include: documentation writer, manual writer, and information developer.

In 2008, there were a total of 3,619,782 jobs in Wisconsin. The average annual income was $37,770 in 2008, up from $36,990 in 2007. The unemployment rate in Wisconsin was 8.5% in 2009, which has grown by 3.7% since the previous year. Roughly 22.4% of Wisconsin residents have college degrees, which is lower than the national average.

The top industries in Wisconsin include dairy product manufacturing, cheese manufacturing, and converted paper product manufacturing. Notable tourist attractions include the Eisner Museum of Advertising & Design, the Milwaukee County Historical Society, and the CAPT Frederick Pabst Mansion.

CITIES WITH Technical Writer OPPORTUNITIES IN Wisconsin


JOB DESCRIPTION: Technical Writer

Technical Writer video from the State of New Jersey Dept. of Labor and Workforce Development

In general, technical writers write technical materials, such as equipment manuals, appendices, or operating and maintenance instructions. They also may assist in layout work.

Every day, technical writers are expected to be able to write clearly and communicate well. They need to read and understand documents and reports.

Similar jobs with educational opportunities in Wisconsin include:

  • Audio Visual Technician. Set up or set up and operate audio and video equipment including microphones, sound speakers, video screens, projectors, video monitors, recording equipment, connecting wires and cables, sound and mixing boards, and related electronic equipment for concerts, sports events, meetings and conventions, presentations, and news conferences. May also set up and operate associated spotlights and other custom lighting systems.
  • Copy Writer. Write advertising copy for use by publication or broadcast media to promote sale of goods and services.
  • Editorial Specialist. Perform variety of editorial duties, such as laying out, indexing, and revising content of written materials, in preparation for final publication.
  • News Analyst. Analyze, interpret, and broadcast news received from various sources.
  • Program Director. Direct and coordinate activities of personnel engaged in preparation of radio or television station program schedules and programs.
  • Radio and Television Announcer. Talk on radio or television. May interview guests, act as master of ceremonies, read news flashes, identify station by giving call letters, or announce song title and artist.
  • Reporter. Collect and analyze facts about newsworthy events by interview, investigation, or observation. Report and write stories for newspaper, news magazine, or television.
  • Writer. Create original written works.

LOCATION INFORMATION: Wisconsin

Wisconsin
Wisconsin photo by KKNiteOwl

Wisconsin has a population of 5,654,774, which has grown by 5.43% in the last 10 years. Nicknamed the "Badger State," its capital is Madison, though its biggest city is Milwaukee. In 2008, there were a total of 3,619,782 jobs in Wisconsin. The average annual income was $37,770 in 2008, up from $36,990 the previous year. The unemployment rate in Wisconsin was 8.5% in 2009, which has grown by 3.7% since the previous year. Roughly 22.4% of Wisconsin residents have college degrees, which is lower than the national average.

The top industries in Wisconsin include dairy product manufacturing, cheese manufacturing, and converted paper product manufacturing. Notable tourist destinations include the Charles Allis Art Museum, the Eisner Museum of Advertising & Design, and the Betty Brinn Children's Museum.