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Career and Education Opportunities for Courtroom Clerks in Washington

Washington has a population of 6,664,195, which has grown by 13.07% in the last 10 years. Nicknamed the "Evergreen State," its capital is Olympia, though its largest city is Seattle.

Currently, 8,740 people work as courtroom clerks in Washington. This is expected to grow by 13% to about 9,870 people by 2016. This is better than the national trend for courtroom clerks, which sees this job pool growing by about 8.2% over the next eight years. Courtroom clerks generally perform clerical duties in court of law; prepare docket of cases to be called; secure information for judges; and contact witnesses, attorneys, and litigants to obtain information for court.

Income for courtroom clerks is about $18 hourly or $38,610 per year on average in Washington. Nationally, their income is about $15 per hour or $33,200 per year. Courtroom clerks earn more than people working in the category of Clerical generally in Washington and more than people in the Clerical category nationally.

In 2008, there were a total of 4,012,270 jobs in Washington. The average annual income was $42,747 in 2008, up from $41,919 the preceding year. The unemployment rate in Washington was 8.9% in 2009, which has grown by 3.5% since the previous year. Roughly 27.7% of Washington residents have college degrees, which is higher than the national average.

The top industries in Washington include software publishers, offices of dentists, and overhead traveling crane, hoist, and monorail system manufacturing. Notable tourist attractions include the Last Resort Fire Department, the Laser Fantasy International, and the Birthplace of Seattle Log House Museum.

CITIES WITH Courtroom Clerk OPPORTUNITIES IN Washington


JOB DESCRIPTION: Courtroom Clerk

Courtroom Clerk video from the State of New Jersey Dept. of Labor and Workforce Development

In general, courtroom clerks perform clerical duties in court of law; prepare docket of cases to be called; secure information for judges; and contact witnesses, attorneys, and litigants to obtain information for court.

Every day, courtroom clerks are expected to be able to see details at a very fine level of focus. They need to articulate ideas and problems. It is also important that they listen to and understand others in meetings.

Similar jobs with educational opportunities in Washington include:

  • Broker Assistant. Perform clerical duties involving the purchase or sale of securities. Duties include writing orders for stock purchases and sales, computing transfer taxes, verifying stock transactions, accepting and delivering securities, tracking stock price fluctuations, computing equity, and keeping records of daily transactions and holdings.
  • Correspondence Clerk. Compose letters in reply to requests for merchandise, damage claims, credit and other information, delinquent accounts, or unsatisfactory services. Duties may include gathering data to formulate reply and typing correspondence.
  • File Clerk. File correspondence, cards, and other records in alphabetical or numerical order or according to the filing system used. Locate and remove material from file when requested.
  • Front Desk Manager. Accommodate hotel, motel, and resort patrons by registering and assigning rooms to guests, issuing room keys, transmitting and receiving messages, keeping records of occupied rooms and guests' accounts, making and confirming reservations, and presenting statements to and collecting payments from departing guests.
  • Insurance Claims Processor. Obtain information from insured or designated persons for purpose of settling claim with insurance carrier.
  • Insurance Processing Clerk. Process applications for, changes to, and cancellation of insurance policies. Duties include reviewing insurance applications to ensure that all questions have been answered, compiling data on insurance policy changes, changing policy records to conform to insured party's specifications, compiling data on lapsed insurance policies to determine automatic reinstatement according to company policies, canceling insurance policies as requested by agents, and verifying the accuracy of insurance company records.
  • Legal Secretary. Perform secretarial duties utilizing legal terminology, procedures, and documents. Prepare legal papers and correspondence, such as summonses, complaints, and subpoenas. May also assist with legal research.
  • Library Clerk. Compile records, sort and shelve books, and issue and receive library materials such as pictures, cards, slides and microfilm. Locate library materials for loan and replace material in shelving area, stacks, or files according to identification number and title. Register patrons to permit them to borrow books, periodicals, and other library materials.
  • License Clerk. Issue licenses or permits to qualified applicants. Obtain necessary information; record data; advise applicants on requirements; collect fees; and issue licenses. May conduct oral, written, or performance testing.
  • Loan Inspector. Interview loan applicants to elicit information; investigate applicants' backgrounds and verify references; prepare loan request papers; and forward findings, reports, and documents to appraisal department. Review loan papers to ensure completeness, and complete transactions between loan establishment, borrowers, and sellers upon approval of loan.
  • Municipal Clerk. Draft agendas and bylaws for town or city council; record minutes of council meetings; answer official correspondence; keep fiscal records and accounts; and prepare reports on civic needs.
  • Office Clerk. Perform duties too varied and diverse to be classified in any specific office clerical occupation, requiring limited knowledge of office management systems and procedures. Clerical duties may be assigned in accordance with the office procedures of individual establishments and may include a combination of answering telephones, bookkeeping, typing or word processing, stenography, office machine operation, and filing.
  • Order Clerk. Receive and process incoming orders for materials, merchandise, or services such as repairs, installations, or rental of facilities. Duties include informing customers of receipt, prices, and delays; preparing contracts; and handling complaints.
  • Payroll Bookkeeper. Compile and post employee time and payroll data. May compute employees' time worked, production, and commission. May compute and post wages and deductions. May prepare paychecks.
  • Postal Clerk. Perform any combination of tasks in a post office, such as receive letters and parcels; sell postage and revenue stamps, postal cards, and stamped envelopes; fill out and sell money orders; place mail in pigeon holes of mail rack or in bags according to State, address, or other scheme; and examine mail for correct postage.
  • Procurement Clerk. Compile information and records to draw up purchase orders for procurement of materials and services.
  • Production Planner. Coordinate and expedite the flow of work and materials within or between departments of an establishment according to production schedule. Duties include reviewing and distributing production, work, and shipment schedules; conferring with department supervisors to determine progress of work and completion dates; and compiling reports on progress of work, inventory levels, and production problems.
  • Receptionist. Answer inquiries and obtain information for general public, customers, and other interested parties. Provide information regarding activities conducted at establishment; location of departments, offices, and employees within organization.
  • Statistical Clerk. Compile and compute data according to statistical formulas for use in statistical studies. May perform actuarial computations and compile charts and graphs for use by actuaries. Includes actuarial clerks.
  • Store Clerk. Receive, store, and issue sales floor merchandise. Stock shelves, racks, and tables with merchandise and arrange merchandise displays to attract customers. May periodically take physical count of stock or check and mark merchandise.
  • Weighter. Weigh, measure, and check materials, supplies, and equipment for the purpose of keeping relevant records. Duties are primarily clerical by nature.

LOCATION INFORMATION: Washington

Washington
Washington photo by Kelvin Kay

Washington has a population of 6,664,195, which has grown by 13.07% over the past 10 years. Nicknamed the "Evergreen State," its capital is Olympia, though its largest city is Seattle. In 2008, there were a total of 4,012,270 jobs in Washington. The average annual income was $42,747 in 2008, up from $41,919 in 2007. The unemployment rate in Washington was 8.9% in 2009, which has grown by 3.5% since the previous year. About 27.7% of Washington residents have college degrees, which is higher than the national average.

The top industries in Washington include software publishers, offices of dentists, and overhead traveling crane, hoist, and monorail system manufacturing. Notable tourist destinations include the Birthplace of Seattle Log House Museum, the History House, and the Boeing and Eames IMAX Theatres.