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Career and Education Opportunities for Librarians in Nashville-Davidson, Tennessee

Nashville-Davidson, Tennessee provides a wide variety of opportunities, both career and educational, for librarians. There are currently 3,170 working librarians in Tennessee; this should grow 10% to 3,490 working librarians in the state by 2016. This is better than the national trend for librarians, which sees this job pool growing by about 7.8% over the next eight years. In general, librarians administer libraries and perform related library services.

Income for librarians is about $21 per hour or $45,220 annually on average in Tennessee. Nationally, their income is about $25 per hour or $52,530 yearly. Librarians earn more than people working in the category of Libraries and Museums generally in Tennessee and more than people in the Libraries and Museums category nationally. Jobs in this field include: information services librarian, young adult librarian, and classifier.

The Nashville-Davidson area is home to fifty schools of higher education, including one within twenty-five miles of Nashville-Davidson where you can get a degree as a librarian. Librarians usually hold a Master's degree, so you can expect to spend about six years training to become a librarian if you already have a high school diploma, or just 2 years if you have a Bachelor's degree.

CAREER DESCRIPTION: Librarian

Librarian video from the State of New Jersey Dept. of Labor and Workforce Development

In general, librarians administer libraries and perform related library services. They also work in a variety of settings, including public libraries, schools, colleges and universities, museums, corporations, government agencies, law firms, non-profit organizations, and healthcare providers.

Librarians engage in professional development efforts, such as taking continuing education classes and attending or participating in conferences and associations. They also locate unusual or unique data in response to specific requests. Equally important, librarians have to search standard reference materials, including online sources and the Internet, to respond to patrons' reference questions. They are often called upon to analyze patrons' requests to establish needed data, and help in furnishing or locating that data. They are expected to respond to customer complaints, taking action as needed. Finally, librarians evaluate vendor products and performance and place orders.

Every day, librarians are expected to be able to read and understand documents and reports. They need to articulate ideas and problems. It is also important that they listen to and understand others in meetings.

It is important for librarians to talk with colleagues and community members and organizations to conduct informational programs, make collection decisions, and decide on library services to offer. They are often called upon to furnish input into the architectural planning of library facilities. They also teach library patrons basic computer skills. They are sometimes expected to inspect and evaluate materials, using book reviews and current holdings, to decide on and order print, audiovisual, and electronic resources. Somewhat less frequently, librarians are also expected to formulate and participate in fundraising drives.

Librarians sometimes are asked to design library policies and procedures. They also have to be able to compile records of books and audiovisual materials on particular subjects and perform public relations work for the library. And finally, they sometimes have to manage interlibrary loans of materials not available in a particular library.

Like many other jobs, librarians must believe in cooperation and coordination and believe in an agile approach to problem solving and deal with change.

Similar jobs with educational opportunities in Nashville-Davidson include:

  • Archivist. Appraise, edit, and direct safekeeping of permanent records and historically valuable documents. Participate in research activities based on archival materials.
  • Curator. Administer affairs of museum and conduct research programs. Direct instructional, research, and public service activities of institution.
  • Elementary School Teacher. Teach pupils in public or private schools at the elementary level basic academic, social, and other formative skills.
  • Museum Technician. Prepare specimens, such as fossils, skeletal parts, and textiles, for museum collection and exhibits. May restore documents or install, arrange, and exhibit materials.

EDUCATIONAL OPPORTUNITIES: Librarian Training

Trevecca Nazarene University - Nashville, TN

Trevecca Nazarene University, 333 Murfreesboro Rd, Nashville, TN 37210. Trevecca Nazarene University is a small university located in Nashville, Tennessee. It is a private not-for-profit school with primarily 4-year or above programs. It has 2,366 students and an admission rate of 68%. Trevecca Nazarene University has a master's degree program in Library Science/Librarianship which graduated thirty students in 2008.

LICENSES

EDUCATION ADMINISTRATION

Licensing agency: Office of Teacher Licensing
Address: Department of Education, Andrew Johnson Tower 5th Floor, 710 James Robertson Pkwy, Nashville, TN 37243-0377

Phone: (615) 532-4885
Website: Office of Teacher Licensing Department of Education

LOCATION INFORMATION: Nashville-Davidson, Tennessee

Nashville-Davidson, Tennessee
Nashville-Davidson, Tennessee photo by Kaldari

Nashville-Davidson is located in Williamson County, Tennessee. It has a population of over 596,462, which has grown by 9.3% over the last ten years. The cost of living index in Nashville-Davidson, 86, is well below the national average. New single-family homes in Nashville-Davidson are priced at $196,100 on average, which is well above the state average. In 2008, 1,483 new homes were constructed in Nashville-Davidson, down from 3,070 the previous year.

The three big industries for women in Nashville-Davidson are health care, educational services, and accommodation and food services. For men, it is construction, health care, and professional, scientific, and technical services. The average travel time to work is about 23 minutes. More than 29.7% of Nashville-Davidson residents have a bachelor's degree, which is higher than the state average. The percentage of residents with a graduate degree, 10.0%, is higher than the state average.

The percentage of Nashville-Davidson residents that are affiliated with a religious congregation, 55.2%, is more than both the national and state average. The most common religious groups are the Southern Baptist Convention, the Catholic Church and the United Methodist Church.