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Career and Education Opportunities for Manufacturing Engineers in Providence, Rhode Island

There is a wide variety of career and education opportunities for manufacturing engineers in the Providence, Rhode Island area. There are currently 510 working manufacturing engineers in Rhode Island; this should grow 7% to 550 working manufacturing engineers in the state by 2016. This is better than the nation as a whole, where employment opportunities for manufacturing engineers are expected to grow by about 6.7%. Manufacturing engineers generally apply knowledge of materials and engineering theory and methods to design, integrate, and improve manufacturing systems or related processes.

Manufacturing engineers earn approximately $44 per hour or $93,000 per year on average in Rhode Island. Nationally they average about $42 hourly or $88,570 per year. Incomes for manufacturing engineers are better than in the overall category of Engineering in Rhode Island, and better than the overall Engineering category nationally. Manufacturing engineers work in a variety of jobs, including: manufacturing engineering manager, engineer, process, and manufacturing applications engineer.

The Providence area is home to fifty-five schools of higher education, including two within twenty-five miles of Providence where you can get a degree as a manufacturing engineer. The most common level of education for manufacturing engineers is a Bachelor's degree. It will take about four years to learn to be a manufacturing engineer if you already have a high school diploma.

CAREER DESCRIPTION: Manufacturing Engineer

In general, manufacturing engineers apply knowledge of materials and engineering theory and methods to design, integrate, and improve manufacturing systems or related processes. They also may work with commercial or industrial designers to refine product designs to increase producibility and decrease costs.

Manufacturing engineers identify opportunities or implement changes to further optimize products or reduce costs using knowledge of fabrication processes, tooling and production equipment, assembly methods, quality control standards, or product layout, materials and parts. They also apply continuous improvement methods such as lean manufacturing to enhance manufacturing quality or cost-effectiveness. Equally important, manufacturing engineers have to communicate manufacturing capabilities or other data to enable production processes. They are often called upon to train production personnel in new or existing methods. They are expected to layout testing methods and test finished products or process capabilities to determine standards or validate process requirements. Finally, manufacturing engineers supervise technicians or other engineers.

Every day, manufacturing engineers are expected to be able to read and understand documents and reports. They need to articulate ideas and problems. It is also important that they listen to and understand others in meetings.

Manufacturing engineers sometimes are asked to purchase equipment or parts. They also have to be able to design layouts of equipment or work spaces to attain maximum efficiency and layout or troubleshoot manufacturing equipment. And finally, they sometimes have to furnish technical expertise or support pertaining to manufacturing.

Like many other jobs, manufacturing engineers must be able to absorb the factors involved and a problem and provide a well thought out solution and be reliable.

Similar jobs with educational opportunities in Providence include:

  • Biomedical Engineer. Apply knowledge of engineering, biology, and biomechanical principles to the design, development, and evaluation of biological and health systems and products, such as artificial organs, prostheses, instrumentation, medical information systems, and health management and care delivery systems.
  • Chemical Engineer. Design chemical plant equipment and devise processes for manufacturing chemicals and products, such as gasoline, synthetic rubber, and pulp, by applying principles and technology of chemistry, physics, and engineering.
  • Civil Engineer. Perform engineering duties in planning, designing, and overseeing construction and maintenance of building structures, and facilities, such as roads, railroads, airports, bridges, harbors, channels, dams, irrigation projects, pipelines, power plants, water and sewage systems, and waste disposal units. Includes architectural, structural, and geo-technical engineers.
  • Computer Engineer. Research, design, and test computer or computer-related equipment for commercial, industrial, or scientific use. May supervise the manufacturing and installation of computer or computer-related equipment and components.
  • Electrical Engineer. Design, develop, or supervise the manufacturing and installation of electrical equipment, components, or systems for commercial, industrial, or scientific use.
  • Electronics Engineer. Research, design, and test electronic components and systems for commercial, industrial, or scientific use utilizing knowledge of electronic theory and materials properties. Design electronic circuits and components for use in fields such as telecommunications, aerospace guidance and propulsion control, acoustics, or instruments and controls.
  • Fire Prevention Research Engineer. Research causes of fires, determine fire protection methods, and design or recommend materials or equipment such as structural components or fire-detection equipment to assist organizations in safeguarding life and property against fire, explosion, and related hazards.
  • Health, Safety, and Environment Manager. Plan, implement, and coordinate safety programs, requiring application of engineering principles and technology, to prevent or correct unsafe environmental working conditions.
  • Industrial Engineer. Design, develop, and evaluate integrated systems for managing industrial production processes including human work factors, quality control, inventory control, logistics and material flow, cost analysis, and production coordination.
  • Mechanical Engineer. Perform engineering duties in planning and designing tools, engines, and other mechanically functioning equipment. Oversee installation, operation, and repair of such equipment as centralized heat, gas, and steam systems.
  • Product Safety Engineer. Develop and conduct tests to evaluate product safety levels and recommend measures to reduce or eliminate hazards.

EDUCATIONAL OPPORTUNITIES: Manufacturing Engineer Training

Community College of Rhode Island - Warwick, RI

Community College of Rhode Island, 400 East Ave, Warwick, RI 02886-1807. Community College of Rhode Island is a large college located in Warwick, Rhode Island. It is a public school with primarily 2-year programs and has 17,612 students. Community College of Rhode Island has a one to two year program in Manufacturing Engineering.

University of Rhode Island - Kingston, RI

University of Rhode Island, , Kingston, RI 02881. University of Rhode Island is a large university located in Kingston, Rhode Island. It is a public school with primarily 4-year or above programs. It has 15,609 students and an admission rate of 82%. University of Rhode Island has bachelor's degree, master's degree, and doctor's degree programs in Industrial Engineering which graduated two, five, and one students respectively in 2008.

CERTIFICATIONS

Certified Forensic Claims Consultant : AACE International's Certified Forensic Claims Consultant (CFCC) certification program is designed to establish credentials to recognize your professional expertise.

For more information, see the AACE International (Association for the Advancement of Cost Engineering through total cost management) website.

Geometric Dimensioning & Tolerancing Professional - Technologist: ASME GDTP Certification provides the means to recognize proficiency in the understanding and application of the geometric dimensioning and tolerancing (GD&T) principles expressed in the ASME Y14.

For more information, see the American Society of Mechanical Engineers International website.

Certified Energy Manager: Since its inception in 1981, the Certified Energy Manager (CEM®) credential has become widely accepted and used as a measure of professional accomplishment within the energy management field.

For more information, see the Association of Energy Engineers website.

Certified Energy Auditor: The Certified Energy Auditor (CEA) certification identifies professionals as having the required knowledge and experience needed to succeed in the growing field of energy auditing.

For more information, see the Association of Energy Engineers website.

Protective Coatings Specialist: This certification is geared toward individuals who are experienced, knowledgeable and capable of performing work at an advanced level in both the theory and practice of corrosion prevention and control, and who are capable of performing work at an advanced level in the protective coatings field.

For more information, see the NACE International website.

LOCATION INFORMATION: Providence, Rhode Island

Providence, Rhode Island
Providence, Rhode Island photo by Flickr_upload_bot

Providence is situated in Providence County, Rhode Island. It has a population of over 171,557, which has shrunk by 1.2% over the last ten years. The cost of living index in Providence, 105, is above the national average. New single-family homes in Providence are valued at $75,900 on average, which is far less than the state average. In 2008, seventeen new homes were constructed in Providence, down from forty-seven the previous year.

The three most popular industries for women in Providence are educational services, health care, and miscellaneous manufacturing. For men, it is educational services, accommodation and food services, and miscellaneous manufacturing. The average travel time to work is about 20 minutes. More than 24.4% of Providence residents have a bachelor's degree, which is lower than the state average. The percentage of residents with a graduate degree, 11.3%, is higher than the state average.

The unemployment rate in Providence is 14.5%, which is greater than Rhode Island's average of 12.2%.

The percentage of Providence residents that are affiliated with a religious congregation, 63.6%, is more than both the national and state average. United Pentecostal Church, United Presbyterian Church and Providence Assembly of God Church are some of the churches located in Providence. The most common religious groups are the Catholic Church, the American Baptist Churches in the USA and the Episcopal Church.

Providence is home to the Fall River Iron Works and the Broadway-Armory Historic District as well as Burnside Park and Customhouse Historic District. Shopping malls in the area include Silver Lake Plaza Shopping Center, Shopperstown Shopping Center and Corliss Landing Shopping Center. Visitors to Providence can choose from Historic Jacob Hill Farm Bed and Breakfast Inn, Agora Restaurant & Bar and Old Court Bed & Breakfast for temporary stays in the area.