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Career and Education Opportunities for Industrial Machinery Mechanics in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

There are many career and education opportunities for industrial machinery mechanics in the Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania area. Currently, 16,700 people work as industrial machinery mechanics in Pennsylvania. This is expected to grow by 15% to about 19,100 people by 2016. This is better than the national trend for industrial machinery mechanics, which sees this job pool growing by about 7.3% over the next eight years. Industrial machinery mechanics generally repair, install, or maintain industrial production and processing machinery or refinery and pipeline distribution systems.

Industrial machinery mechanics earn about $20 per hour or $42,300 yearly on average in Pennsylvania and about $20 hourly or $43,670 per year on average nationally. Incomes for industrial machinery mechanics are better than in the overall category of Specialized Equipment in Pennsylvania, and better than the overall Specialized Equipment category nationally.

The Pittsburgh area is home to eighty-three schools of higher education, including two within twenty-five miles of Pittsburgh where you can get a degree as an industrial machinery mechanic. Given that the most common education level for industrial machinery mechanics is a post-secondary certificate, you can expect to spend a short time studying to be an industrial machinery mechanic if you already have a high school diploma.

CAREER DESCRIPTION: Industrial Machinery Mechanic

Industrial Machinery Mechanic video from the State of New Jersey Dept. of Labor and Workforce Development

In general, industrial machinery mechanics repair, install, or maintain industrial production and processing machinery or refinery and pipeline distribution systems.

Industrial machinery mechanics disassemble machinery and apparatus to remove parts and make fixes. They also examine parts for defects such as breakage and excessive wear. Equally important, industrial machinery mechanics have to repair and remove broken or malfunctioning parts of machinery and equipment. They are often called upon to repair and maintain the operating state of industrial production and processing machinery and equipment. They are expected to clean and adjust parts, equipment, and machinery. Finally, industrial machinery mechanics observe and test the operation of machinery and equipment so as to diagnose malfunctions, using voltmeters and other testing devices.

Every day, industrial machinery mechanics are expected to be able to respond quickly in general. It is also important that they maintain precise control of objects and devices through a range of movements.

It is important for industrial machinery mechanics to demonstrate equipment functions and features to machine operators. They are often called upon to enter codes and instructions to program computer-controlled machinery. They also operate newly repaired machinery and apparatus to verify the adequacy of fixes. They are sometimes expected to record fixes and maintenance performed. Somewhat less frequently, industrial machinery mechanics are also expected to examine parts for defects such as breakage and excessive wear.

And finally, they sometimes have to reassemble equipment after completion of inspections or fixes.

Like many other jobs, industrial machinery mechanics must be thorough and dependable and be reliable.

Similar jobs with educational opportunities in Pittsburgh include:

  • Auto Mechanic. Repair automobiles, trucks, and other vehicles. Master mechanics repair virtually any part on the vehicle or specialize in the transmission system.
  • Machine Repairman. Lubricate machinery, change parts, or perform other routine machinery maintenance.
  • Mechanical Door Repairer. Install, service, or repair opening and closing mechanisms of automatic doors and hydraulic door closers. Includes garage door mechanics.
  • Medical Equipment Repairer. Test, adjust, or repair biomedical or electromedical equipment.
  • Millwright. Install, dismantle, or move machinery and heavy equipment according to layout plans, blueprints, or other drawings.
  • Vending Machine Mechanic. Install, service, or repair coin, vending, or amusement machines including video games, juke boxes, or slot machines.

EDUCATIONAL OPPORTUNITIES: Industrial Machinery Mechanic Training

Community College of Allegheny County - Pittsburgh, PA

Community College of Allegheny County, 800 Allegheny Ave, Pittsburgh, PA 15233-1895. Community College of Allegheny County is a large college located in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. It is a public school with primarily 2-year programs and has 19,366 students. Community College of Allegheny County has a one to two year program in Industrial Mechanics and Maintenance Technology which graduated one student in 2008.

West Virginia Northern Community College - Wheeling, WV

West Virginia Northern Community College, 1704 Market St., Wheeling, WV 26003-3699. West Virginia Northern Community College is a small college located in Wheeling, West Virginia. It is a public school with primarily 2-year programs and has 2,924 students. West Virginia Northern Community College has a one to two year program in Heavy/Industrial Equipment Maintenance Technologies, Other Specialties which graduated seven students in 2008.

CERTIFICATIONS

Biomedical Electronics Technician: Biomedical electronics technicians are expected to obtain knowledge of the principles of modern biomedical techniques, the proper procedure in the care, handling and maintenance of biomedical equipment and to display an attitude/behavior expected of an electronics technician who works in a hospital or healthcare environment.

For more information, see the ETA International website.

Level I Machine Lubrication Technician: Common job titles for the individual who would become Level I MLT certified include Lubrication Technician, PM Technician, Millwright, Mechanic, etc.

For more information, see the International Council for Machinery Lubrication website.

Bulk Medical Gas Systems Installer 6015: Certification to this standard shall be through a method approved by the firm's Quality Control Unit (QCU).

For more information, see the National Inspection, Testing and Certification Corporation website.

Certified Maintenance Reliability Professional: In support of increasing the recognition and assurance of the capabilities of maintenance and reliability processionals, SMRPCO has developed and continued to improve a certification process for maintenance and reliability management.

For more information, see the Society for Maintenance & Reliability Professionals website.

Certified Industrial Maintenance Mechanic: Certified Industrial Maintenance Mechanic® (CIMM®) Program CIMM® will provide a non-biased, third-party, objective assessment and confirmation of the skills of your industrial maintenance mechanics.

For more information, see the Society for Maintenance & Reliability Professionals website.

Certified Lubrication Specialist: Certification recognizes those individuals who possess current knowledge of lubrication fundamentals and theory.

For more information, see the Society of Tribologists and Lubrication Engineers website.

Oil Monitoring Analyst: Oil Monitoring Analyst certification is designed to encourage and demonstrate an agreed upon level of competence in the field of machinery oil monitoring.

For more information, see the Society of Tribologists and Lubrication Engineers website.

Certified Metalworking Fluids Specialist: Certified Metalworking Fluids Specialists are those individuals who have met minimum standards of experience, knowledge and written examination requirements as established by the STLE Metalworking Fluids Certification Committee to provide technical consultation in the field of metalworking fluids management.

For more information, see the Society of Tribologists and Lubrication Engineers website.

LOCATION INFORMATION: Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania photo by Conk 9

Pittsburgh is located in Allegheny County, Pennsylvania. It has a population of over 310,037, which has shrunk by 7.3% over the last ten years. The cost of living index in Pittsburgh, 86, is well below the national average. New single-family homes in Pittsburgh cost $196,700 on average, which is far greater than the state average. In 2008, one hundred eighty-five new homes were built in Pittsburgh, up from one hundred seventeen the previous year.

The three most popular industries for women in Pittsburgh are health care, educational services, and finance and insurance. For men, it is educational services, health care, and accommodation and food services. The average travel time to work is about 23 minutes. More than 26.2% of Pittsburgh residents have a bachelor's degree, which is higher than the state average. The percentage of residents with a graduate degree, 12.5%, is higher than the state average.

The unemployment rate in Pittsburgh is 7.8%, which is less than Pennsylvania's average of 8.4%.

The percentage of Pittsburgh residents that are affiliated with a religious congregation, 71.8%, is more than both the national and state average. Saint Pauls Cathedral, Saint Patrick Roman Cathlic Church and Saint Nicholas Greek Orthodox Church are some of the churches located in Pittsburgh. The largest religious groups are the Catholic Church, the Presbyterian Church (USA) and the United Methodist Church.

Pittsburgh is home to the Mount Washington Overlook and the Golden Triangle as well as Magee Playground and Kennard Playground. Shopping centers in the area include Shadyside Shopping Center and Allegheny Center Mall. Visitors to Pittsburgh can choose from Best Western University Center, Avalon Motel and Four Points By Sheraton Pittsburgh Airport for temporary stays in the area.