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Career and Education Opportunities for Title Examiners in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma

There are many career and education opportunities for title examiners in the Oklahoma City, Oklahoma area. About 1,810 people are currently employed as title examiners in Oklahoma. By 2016, this is expected to shrink by 2% to 1,770 people employed. This is not quite as good as the nation as a whole, where employment opportunities for title examiners are expected to shrink by about 0.7%. Title examiners generally search real estate records, examine titles, or summarize pertinent legal or insurance details for a variety of purposes.

The income of a title examiner is about $16 hourly or $33,840 annually on average in Oklahoma. In the U.S. as a whole, their income is about $18 hourly or $38,300 annually on average. Incomes for title examiners are not quite as good as in the overall category of Administration and Support in Oklahoma, and not quite as good as the overall Administration and Support category nationally. Title examiners work in a variety of jobs, including: title department manager, title agent, and abstracter.

There are two schools within twenty-five miles of Oklahoma City where you can study to be a title examiner, among forty-four schools of higher education total in the Oklahoma City area. The most common level of education for title examiners is a high school diploma or GED. It will take only a short time to learn to be a title examiner if you already have a high school diploma.

CAREER DESCRIPTION: Title Examiner

Title Examiner video from the State of New Jersey Dept. of Labor and Workforce Development

In general, title examiners search real estate records, examine titles, or summarize pertinent legal or insurance details for a variety of purposes. They also may compile lists of mortgages, contracts, and other instruments pertaining to titles by searching public and private records for law firms, real estate agencies, or title insurance companies.

Title examiners examine documentation such as mortgages and agreements in order to confirm factors such as properties' legal descriptions or restrictions. They also copy or summarize recorded documents, such as mortgages and contracts, that affect property titles. Equally important, title examiners have to read search requests so as to ascertain types of title evidence required and to obtain descriptions of properties and names of involved parties. They are often called upon to ready reports describing any title encumbrances encountered during searching efforts, and outlining actions needed to clear titles. They are expected to obtain maps or drawings delineating properties from company title plants and/or assessors' offices. Finally, title examiners enter into recordkeeping systems appropriate data needed to generate new title records or update existing ones.

Every day, title examiners are expected to be able to read and understand documents and reports. They need to articulate ideas and problems.

It is important for title examiners to verify accuracy and completeness of land-related documents accepted for registration; ready rejection notices when documents are not acceptable. They are often called upon to direct efforts of staff who search records and examine titles, assigning and evaluating work, and providing technical guidance as needed. They also summarize pertinent legal or insurance details, or sections of statutes or case law from reference books so that they can be used in examinations, or as proofs or ready reference. They are sometimes expected to retrieve and examine real estate closing files for accuracy and to insure that data included is recorded and executed in line with regulations. Somewhat less frequently, title examiners are also expected to assess fees pertaining to registration of property-related documents.

Title examiners sometimes are asked to ready and issue title commitments and title insurance policies on the basis of data compiled from title searches. They also have to be able to ready real estate closing statements, utilizing knowledge and expertise in real estate procedures And finally, they sometimes have to decide on whether land-related documents can be registered under the relevant legislation such as the Land Titles Act.

Like many other jobs, title examiners must be thorough and dependable and be reliable.

Similar jobs with educational opportunities in Oklahoma City include:

  • Administrative Law Judge. Conduct hearings to decide or recommend decisions on claims concerning government programs or other government-related matters and prepare decisions. Determine penalties or the existence and the amount of liability, or recommend the acceptance or rejection of claims, or compromise settlements.
  • Arbitrator. Facilitate negotiation and conflict resolution through dialogue. Resolve conflicts outside of the court system by mutual consent of parties involved.
  • Court Reporter. Use verbatim methods and equipment to capture, store, and transcribe pretrial and trial proceedings or other information. Includes stenocaptioners who operate computerized stenographic captioning equipment to provide captions of live or prerecorded broadcasts for hearing-impaired viewers.
  • Judge. Arbitrate, advise, or administer justice in a court of law. May sentence defendant in criminal cases according to government statutes. May determine liability of defendant in civil cases. May issue marriage licenses and perform wedding ceremonies.
  • Legal Assistant. Assist lawyers by researching legal precedent, investigating facts, or preparing legal documents. Conduct research to support a legal proceeding, to formulate a defense, or to initiate legal action.
  • Paralegal. Assist lawyers or judges by researching or preparing legal documents. May meet with clients or assist lawyers and judges in court.

EDUCATIONAL OPPORTUNITIES: Title Examiner Training

Vatterott College - Oklahoma City, OK

Vatterott College, 4621 NW 23, Oklahoma City, OK 73127. Vatterott College is a small college located in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. It is a private for-profit school with primarily 2-year programs and has 310 students. Vatterott College has an associate's degree program in Legal Assistant/Paralegal which graduated five students in 2008.

Rose State College - Midwest City, OK

Rose State College, 6420 S E 15th, Midwest City, OK 73110-2799. Rose State College is a medium sized college located in Midwest City, Oklahoma. It is a public school with primarily 2-year programs and has 8,427 students. Rose State College has an associate's degree program in Legal Assistant/Paralegal which graduated nineteen students in 2008.

LOCATION INFORMATION: Oklahoma City, Oklahoma

Oklahoma City, Oklahoma
Oklahoma City, Oklahoma photo by CPacker

Oklahoma City is located in Oklahoma County, Oklahoma. It has a population of over 551,789, which has grown by 9.0% in the past ten years. The cost of living index in Oklahoma City, 82, is well below the national average. New single-family homes in Oklahoma City cost $142,600 on average, which is below the state average. In 2008, 1,474 new homes were built in Oklahoma City, down from 2,559 the previous year.

The three most popular industries for women in Oklahoma City are health care, educational services, and accommodation and food services. For men, it is construction, public administration, and accommodation and food services. The average travel time to work is about 21 minutes. More than 24.0% of Oklahoma City residents have a bachelor's degree, which is higher than the state average. The percentage of residents with a graduate degree, 8.1%, is higher than the state average.

The unemployment rate in Oklahoma City is 6.5%, which is less than Oklahoma's average of 7.1%.

The percentage of Oklahoma City residents that are affiliated with a religious congregation, 65.7%, is more than both the national and state average. Grace Place Baptist Church, Grace Presbyterian Church and Grace United Methodist Church are some of the churches located in Oklahoma City. The most prominent religious groups are the Southern Baptist Convention, the United Methodist Church and the Catholic Church.

Oklahoma City is home to the Colonial Square and the 50 Penn Place as well as Rotary Park and River Park. Shopping malls in the area include 240 Plaza Shopping Center, 74 South Shopping Center and Council Crossings Shopping Center. Visitors to Oklahoma City can choose from Rodeway Inn Oklahoma City, Harvey Janitorial Sales and Market Source for temporary stays in the area.