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Career and Education Opportunities for Audio-Visual Directors in Norman, Oklahoma

There are many career and education opportunities for audio-visual directors in the Norman, Oklahoma area. The national trend for audio-visual directors sees this job pool growing by about 10.3% over the next eight years. Audio-visual directors generally prepare, plan, and operate audio-visual teaching aids for use in education.

The income of an audio-visual director is about $15 per hour or $31,190 per year on average in Oklahoma. In the U.S. as a whole, their income is about $20 per hour or $43,390 annually on average. Compared with people working in the overall category of Libraries and Museums, people working as audio-visual directors in Oklahoma earn less. They earn more than people working in the overall category of Libraries and Museums nationally. People working as audio-visual directors can fill a number of jobs, such as: audio visual specialist, audio-visual arts director, and television technician.

The Norman area is home to thirty-seven schools of higher education, including one within twenty-five miles of Norman where you can get a degree as an audio-visual director. Audio-visual directors usually hold a Master's degree, so you can expect to spend about six years training to become an audio-visual director if you already have a high school diploma, or just 2 years if you have a Bachelor's degree.

CAREER DESCRIPTION: Audio-Visual Director

In general, audio-visual directors prepare, plan, and operate audio-visual teaching aids for use in education. They also may record, catalogue, and file audio-visual materials.

Audio-visual directors assemble and operate audiovisual equipment such as cameras, film and slide projectors, and recording equipment, for meetings, events, classes, seminars and video conferences. They also instruct users in the selection and layout of audiovisual materials, and assist them in the preparation of instructional materials and the rehearsal of presentations. Equally important, audio-visual directors have to attend conventions and conferences, read trade journals, and communicate with industry insiders to keep abreast of industry developments. Finally, audio-visual directors maintain hardware and software and color laser printers.

Every day, audio-visual directors are expected to be able to articulate ideas and problems. They need to understand events and object details at a distance. It is also important that they speak clearly.

It is important for audio-visual directors to perform simple maintenance tasks such as cleaning monitors and lenses and changing batteries and light bulbs. They are often called upon to design manuals or related materials for use in conjunction with production materials. They also offer presentations and workshops on the role of multimedia in effective presentations. They are sometimes expected to talk with teachers to decide on course materials and to establish which training aids are best suited to particular grade levels. Somewhat less frequently, audio-visual directors are also expected to design preproduction concepts and incorporate them into outlines and graphics.

Audio-visual directors sometimes are asked to direct and schedule efforts of assistants and other personnel during production. They also have to be able to formulate and ready audiovisual teaching aids and methods for use in school systems and construct and position properties, sets and other equipment. And finally, they sometimes have to design manuals or related materials for use in conjunction with production materials.

Like many other jobs, audio-visual directors must believe in cooperation and coordination and be reliable.

Similar jobs with educational opportunities in Norman include:

  • Archivist. Appraise, edit, and direct safekeeping of permanent records and historically valuable documents. Participate in research activities based on archival materials.
  • Curator. Administer affairs of museum and conduct research programs. Direct instructional, research, and public service activities of institution.
  • Librarian. Administer libraries and perform related library services. Work in a variety of settings, including public libraries, schools, colleges and universities, museums, corporations, government agencies, law firms, non-profit organizations, and healthcare providers. Tasks may include selecting, acquiring, and maintaining library materials; and furnishing reference, bibliographical, and readers' advisory services. May perform in-depth, strategic research, and synthesize, analyze, and filter information. May set up or work with databases and information systems to catalogue and access information.
  • Library Information Technian. Assist librarians by helping readers in the use of library catalogs, databases, and indexes to locate books and other materials; and by answering questions that require only brief consultation of standard reference. Compile records; sort and shelve books; remove or repair damaged books; register patrons; check materials in and out of the circulation process. Replace materials in shelving area (stacks) or files. Includes bookmobile drivers who operate bookmobiles or light trucks that pull trailers to specific locations on a predetermined schedule and assist with providing services in mobile libraries.
  • Museum Technician. Prepare specimens, such as fossils, skeletal parts, and textiles, for museum collection and exhibits. May restore documents or install, arrange, and exhibit materials.

EDUCATIONAL OPPORTUNITIES: Audio-Visual Director Training

University of Oklahoma Norman Campus - Norman, OK

University of Oklahoma Norman Campus, 660 Parrington Oval, Norman, OK 73019-3072. University of Oklahoma Norman Campus is a large university located in Norman, Oklahoma. It is a public school with primarily 4-year or above programs. It has 26,201 students and an admission rate of 73%. University of Oklahoma Norman Campus has a master's degree program in Educational/Instructional Media Design which graduated six students in 2008.


Norman, Oklahoma
Norman, Oklahoma photo by Okguy

Norman is located in Cleveland County, Oklahoma. It has a population of over 106,957, which has grown by 11.8% over the last ten years. The cost of living index in Norman, 84, is well below the national average. New single-family homes in Norman are priced at $184,600 on average, which is well above the state average. In 2008, five hundred sixteen new homes were built in Norman, up from four hundred nineteen the previous year.

The three big industries for women in Norman are educational services, health care, and accommodation and food services. For men, it is educational services, accommodation and food services, and construction. The average commute to work is about 21 minutes. More than 39.8% of Norman residents have a bachelor's degree, which is higher than the state average. The percentage of residents with a graduate degree, 16.6%, is higher than the state average.

The unemployment rate in Norman is 4.7%, which is less than Oklahoma's average of 7.1%.

The percentage of Norman residents that are affiliated with a religious congregation, 44.3%, is less than both the national and state average. Alameda Baptist Church, Alameda Church of Christ and All Welcome Victory Church are among the churches located in Norman. The largest religious groups are the Southern Baptist Convention, the Catholic Church and the United Methodist Church.

Norman is home to the Cerebral Palsy Institute and the Park on Main as well as Owen Field and Rotary Park. Shopping malls in the area include Colonial Estates Shopping Center, Anatole Shopping Center and Carriage Plaza Shopping Center. Visitors to Norman can choose from Ramada Days Inn, Montford Inn and Guest Inn - Norman for temporary stays in the area.