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Career and Education Opportunities for Postal Clerks in North Carolina

North Carolina has a population of 9,380,884, which has grown by 16.54% over the past decade. Nicknamed the "Tar Heel State," its capital is Raleigh, though its biggest city is Charlotte.

There are currently 2,180 working postal clerks in North Carolina; this should grow by 9% to about 2,370 working postal clerks in the state by 2016. This is better than the nation as a whole, where employment opportunities for postal clerks are expected to shrink by about 18.0%. In general, postal clerks perform any combination of tasks in a post office, such as receive letters and parcels; sell postage and revenue stamps, postal cards, and stamped envelopes; fill out and sell money orders; place mail in pigeon holes of mail rack or in bags according to State, address, or other scheme; and examine mail for correct postage.

The income of a postal clerk is about $24 hourly or $51,040 yearly on average in North Carolina. In the U.S. as a whole, their income is about $24 hourly or $51,040 per year on average. Earnings for postal clerks are better than earnings in the general category of Postal in North Carolina and better than general Postal category earnings nationally.

In 2008, there were a total of 5,497,808 jobs in North Carolina. The average annual income was $35,249 in 2008, up from $34,865 the previous year. The unemployment rate in North Carolina was 10.6% in 2009, which has grown by 4.4% since the previous year. About 22.5% of North Carolina residents have college degrees, which is lower than the national average.

The top industries in North Carolina include beverage product manufacturing, tobacco manufacturing, and pharmaceutical preparation manufacturing. Notable tourist destinations include the Mint Museum Shops, the Mint Hill Country Doctors Museum, and the Discovery Place & the Charlotteservr IMX DME Thtre.

CITIES WITH Postal Clerk OPPORTUNITIES IN North Carolina


JOB DESCRIPTION: Postal Clerk

In general, postal clerks perform any combination of tasks in a post office, such as receive letters and parcels; sell postage and revenue stamps, postal cards, and stamped envelopes; fill out and sell money orders; place mail in pigeon holes of mail rack or in bags according to State, address, or other scheme; and examine mail for correct postage.

Every day, postal clerks are expected to be able to articulate ideas and problems. They need to listen to and understand others in meetings.

Similar jobs with educational opportunities in North Carolina include:

  • Courtroom Clerk. Perform clerical duties in court of law; prepare docket of cases to be called; secure information for judges; and contact witnesses, attorneys, and litigants to obtain information for court.
  • Insurance Claims Processor. Obtain information from insured or designated persons for purpose of settling claim with insurance carrier.
  • Library Clerk. Compile records, sort and shelve books, and issue and receive library materials such as pictures, cards, slides and microfilm. Locate library materials for loan and replace material in shelving area, stacks, or files according to identification number and title. Register patrons to permit them to borrow books, periodicals, and other library materials.
  • License Clerk. Issue licenses or permits to qualified applicants. Obtain necessary information; record data; advise applicants on requirements; collect fees; and issue licenses. May conduct oral, written, or performance testing.
  • Mail Carrier and Clerk. Sort mail for delivery. Deliver mail on established route by vehicle or on foot.
  • Mail Clerk. Prepare incoming and outgoing mail for distribution. Use hand or mail handling machines to time stamp, open, and route incoming mail; and address, seal, and affix postage to outgoing mail or packages. Duties may also include keeping necessary records and completed forms.
  • Office Clerk. Perform duties too varied and diverse to be classified in any specific office clerical occupation, requiring limited knowledge of office management systems and procedures. Clerical duties may be assigned in accordance with the office procedures of individual establishments and may include a combination of answering telephones, bookkeeping, typing or word processing, stenography, office machine operation, and filing.
  • Postal Service Mail Sorter Operator. Prepare incoming and outgoing mail for distribution. Examine, sort, and route mail by State, type of mail, or other scheme. Load, operate, and occasionally adjust and repair mail processing, sorting, and canceling machinery. Keep records of shipments, pouches, and sacks; and other duties related to mail handling within the postal service. Must complete a competitive exam.
  • Statement Clerk. Prepare and distribute bank statements to customers, answer inquiries, and reconcile discrepancies in records and accounts.
  • Store Clerk. Receive, store, and issue sales floor merchandise. Stock shelves, racks, and tables with merchandise and arrange merchandise displays to attract customers. May periodically take physical count of stock or check and mark merchandise.
  • Weighter. Weigh, measure, and check materials, supplies, and equipment for the purpose of keeping relevant records. Duties are primarily clerical by nature.

LOCATION INFORMATION: North Carolina

North Carolina
North Carolina photo by Jan van der Crabben

North Carolina has a population of 9,380,884, which has grown by 16.54% over the past 10 years. Nicknamed the "Tar Heel State," its capital is Raleigh, though its most populous city is Charlotte. In 2008, there were a total of 5,497,808 jobs in North Carolina. The average annual income was $35,249 in 2008, up from $34,865 the preceding year. The unemployment rate in North Carolina was 10.6% in 2009, which has grown by 4.4% since the previous year. Approximately 22.5% of North Carolina residents have college degrees, which is lower than the national average.

The top industries in North Carolina include beverage product manufacturing, tobacco manufacturing, and pharmaceutical preparation manufacturing. Notable tourist destinations include the Mint Hill Country Doctors Museum, the Levine Museum of the New South, and the McGill Rose Garden.