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Career and Education Opportunities for Credit Investigators in North Carolina

North Carolina has a population of 9,380,884, which has grown by 16.54% in the last 10 years. Nicknamed the "Tar Heel State," its capital is Raleigh, though its largest city is Charlotte.

About 1,540 people are currently employed as credit investigators in North Carolina. By 2016, this is expected to shrink 9% to 1,410 people employed. This is not quite as good as the national trend for credit investigators, which sees this job pool growing by about 2.8% over the next eight years. Credit investigators generally investigate history and credit standing of individuals or business establishments applying for credit.

Credit investigators earn approximately $15 hourly or $32,180 annually on average in North Carolina. Nationally they average about $14 per hour or $30,390 annually. Credit investigators earn more than people working in the category of Credit Authorization generally in North Carolina and more than people in the Credit Authorization category nationally.

In 2008, there were a total of 5,497,808 jobs in North Carolina. The average annual income was $35,249 in 2008, up from $34,865 the previous year. The unemployment rate in North Carolina was 10.6% in 2009, which has grown by 4.4% since the previous year. About 22.5% of North Carolina residents have college degrees, which is lower than the national average.

The top industries in North Carolina include beverage product manufacturing, tobacco manufacturing, and pharmaceutical preparation manufacturing. Notable tourist attractions include the Hezekiah Alexander Homesite, the McGill Rose Garden, and the Charlotte Museum of History.

CITIES WITH Credit Investigator OPPORTUNITIES IN North Carolina


JOB DESCRIPTION: Credit Investigator

In general, credit investigators investigate history and credit standing of individuals or business establishments applying for credit. They also telephone or write to credit departments of business and service establishments to obtain information about applicant's credit standing.

Every day, credit investigators are expected to be able to articulate ideas and problems. It is also important that they listen to and understand others in meetings.

Similar jobs with educational opportunities in North Carolina include:

  • Accounts Receivable Specialist. Locate and notify customers of delinquent accounts by mail, telephone, or personal visit to solicit payment. Duties include receiving payment and posting amount to customer's account; preparing statements to credit department if customer fails to respond; initiating repossession proceedings or service disconnection; keeping records of collection and status of accounts.
  • Correspondence Clerk. Compose letters in reply to requests for merchandise, damage claims, credit and other information, delinquent accounts, or unsatisfactory services. Duties may include gathering data to formulate reply and typing correspondence.
  • Customer Care Specialist. Interact with customers to provide information in response to inquiries about products and services and to handle and resolve complaints.
  • Eligibility and Occupancy Interviewer. Determine eligibility of persons applying to receive assistance from government programs and agency resources, such as welfare, unemployment benefits, and public housing.
  • Insurance Claims Processor. Obtain information from insured or designated persons for purpose of settling claim with insurance carrier.
  • Insurance Processing Clerk. Process applications for, changes to, and cancellation of insurance policies. Duties include reviewing insurance applications to ensure that all questions have been answered, compiling data on insurance policy changes, changing policy records to conform to insured party's specifications, compiling data on lapsed insurance policies to determine automatic reinstatement according to company policies, canceling insurance policies as requested by agents, and verifying the accuracy of insurance company records.
  • Municipal Clerk. Draft agendas and bylaws for town or city council; record minutes of council meetings; answer official correspondence; keep fiscal records and accounts; and prepare reports on civic needs.
  • Procurement Clerk. Compile information and records to draw up purchase orders for procurement of materials and services.

LOCATION INFORMATION: North Carolina

North Carolina
North Carolina photo by Jan van der Crabben

North Carolina has a population of 9,380,884, which has grown by 16.54% over the past 10 years. Nicknamed the "Tar Heel State," its capital is Raleigh, though its most populous city is Charlotte. In 2008, there were a total of 5,497,808 jobs in North Carolina. The average annual income was $35,249 in 2008, up from $34,865 the preceding year. The unemployment rate in North Carolina was 10.6% in 2009, which has grown by 4.4% since the previous year. Approximately 22.5% of North Carolina residents have college degrees, which is lower than the national average.

The top industries in North Carolina include beverage product manufacturing, tobacco manufacturing, and pharmaceutical preparation manufacturing. Notable tourist destinations include the Mint Hill Country Doctors Museum, the Levine Museum of the New South, and the McGill Rose Garden.