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Career and Education Opportunities for Forestry and Wildlife Managers in Greensboro, North Carolina

There is a wide variety of career and education opportunities for forestry and wildlife managers in the Greensboro, North Carolina area. There are currently 560 working forestry and wildlife managers in North Carolina; this should grow 5% to about 590 working forestry and wildlife managers in the state by 2016. This is not quite as good as the nation as a whole, where employment opportunities for forestry and wildlife managers are expected to grow by about 8.6%. Forestry and wildlife managers generally compile data pertaining to size, content, and other characteristics of forest tracts, under direction of foresters; train and lead forest workers in forest propagation, fire prevention and suppression.

Forestry and wildlife managers earn about $18 per hour or $38,730 annually on average in North Carolina and about $15 per hour or $32,000 annually on average nationally. Forestry and wildlife managers earn more than people working in the category of Life Science Technical generally in North Carolina and less than people in the Life Science Technical category nationally. People working as forestry and wildlife managers can fill a number of jobs, such as: conservation agent, fire management officer, and grazing aide.

The Greensboro area is home to thirty schools of higher education, including one within twenty-five miles of Greensboro where you can get a degree as a forestry and wildlife manager. Given that the most common education level for forestry and wildlife managers is a Bachelor's degree, you can expect to spend about four years studying to be a forestry and wildlife manager if you already have a high school diploma.

CAREER DESCRIPTION: Forestry and Wildlife Manager

Forestry and Wildlife Manager video from the State of New Jersey Dept. of Labor and Workforce Development

In general, forestry and wildlife managers compile data pertaining to size, content, and other characteristics of forest tracts, under direction of foresters; train and lead forest workers in forest propagation, fire prevention and suppression. They also may assist conservation scientists in managing, improving, and protecting rangelands and wildlife habitats, and help provide technical assistance regarding the conservation of soil, water, and related natural resources.

Every day, forestry and wildlife managers are expected to be able to articulate ideas and problems. They need to listen to and understand others in meetings.

It is important for forestry and wildlife managers to oversee forest protection efforts, including fire control, fire crew training, and coordination of fire detection and public education programs. They are often called upon to patrol park or forest areas to safeguard resources and avoid damage. They also train and lead forest and conservation staff in seasonal efforts. They are sometimes expected to decide on and mark trees for thinning or logging, drawing detailed plans that include access roads. Somewhat less frequently, forestry and wildlife managers are also expected to furnish technical support to forestry research programs in areas such as tree improvement, seed orchard operations, insect and disease surveys, or experimental forestry and forest engineering research.

Forestry and wildlife managers sometimes are asked to formulate and supervise development of access routes and forest roads. They also have to be able to survey and map access roads and forest areas such as burns, cut-over areas and timber sales sections and conduct laboratory or field experiments with plants, animals, insects, diseases and soils. And finally, they sometimes have to measure distances, clean site-lines, and record data to help survey crews.

Like many other jobs, forestry and wildlife managers must believe in cooperation and coordination and believe in an agile approach to problem solving and deal with change.

Similar jobs with educational opportunities in Greensboro include:

  • Agricultural Technician. Set up and maintain laboratory equipment and collect samples from crops or animals. Prepare specimens and record data to assist scientist in biology or related science experiments.
  • Biological Sciences Technician. Assist biological and medical scientists in laboratories. Set up, operate, and maintain laboratory instruments and equipment, monitor experiments, and calculate and record results. May analyze organic substances, such as blood, food, and drugs.
  • Environmental Technician. Perform laboratory and field tests to monitor the environment and investigate sources of pollution, including those that affect health. Under direction of an environmental scientist or specialist, may collect samples of gases, soil, and other materials for testing and take corrective actions as assigned.
  • Food Science Technician. Perform standardized qualitative and quantitative tests to determine physical or chemical properties of food or beverage products.
  • Forensic Investigator. Collect, identify, and analyze physical evidence related to criminal investigations. Perform tests on weapons or substances, such as fiber, hair, and tissue to determine significance to investigation. May testify as expert witnesses on evidence or crime laboratory techniques. May serve as specialists in area of expertise, such as ballistics, fingerprinting, or biochemistry.

EDUCATIONAL OPPORTUNITIES: Forestry and Wildlife Manager Training

High Point University - High Point, NC

High Point University, 833 Montlieu Ave, High Point, NC 27262-3598. High Point University is a small university located in High Point, North Carolina. It is a private not-for-profit school with primarily 4-year or above programs. It has 3,384 students and an admission rate of 74%. High Point University has a bachelor's degree program in Forestry.

LOCATION INFORMATION: Greensboro, North Carolina

Greensboro, North Carolina
Greensboro, North Carolina photo by Yassie

Greensboro is situated in Guilford County, North Carolina. It has a population of over 250,642, which has grown by 11.9% over the last ten years. The cost of living index in Greensboro, 84, is well below the national average. New single-family homes in Greensboro are priced at $140,500 on average, which is well below the state average. In 2008, seven hundred fifty-three new homes were built in Greensboro, down from 1,516 the previous year.

The top three industries for women in Greensboro are educational services, health care, and finance and insurance. For men, it is construction, accommodation and food services, and educational services. The average travel time to work is about 20 minutes. More than 33.9% of Greensboro residents have a bachelor's degree, which is higher than the state average. The percentage of residents with a graduate degree, 10.8%, is higher than the state average.

The unemployment rate in Greensboro is 10.5%, which is less than North Carolina's average of 10.6%.

The percentage of Greensboro residents that are affiliated with a religious congregation, 46.7%, is less than the national average but more than the state average. Muirs Chapel, Mount Tabor Church and Bass Chapel are all churches located in Greensboro. The most common religious groups are the Southern Baptist Convention, the United Methodist Church and the Catholic Church.

Greensboro is home to the Holden Plaza and the English Market as well as Shannon Woods Park and Lake Daniel Park. Shopping centers in the area include Greenbriar Mall, Golden Gate Shopping Center and Carolina Circle Shopping Mall. Visitors to Greensboro can choose from Greensboro Days Inn, Execustay by Marriot and Biltmore Hotel for temporary stays in the area.