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Career and Education Opportunities for Gaming Cashiers in New York

New York has a population of 19,541,453, which has grown by 2.98% in the last 10 years. Nicknamed the "Empire State," its capital is Albany, though its biggest city is New York.

The national trend for gaming cashiers sees this job pool shrinking by about 10.4% over the next eight years. Gaming cashiers generally conduct financial transactions for patrons in gaming establishments.

A person working as a gaming cashier can expect to earn about $11 hourly or $24,930 annually on average in New York and about $11 hourly or $24,890 per year on average in the U.S. as a whole. Gaming cashiers earn less than people working in the category of Billing and Bookkeeping generally in New York and less than people in the Billing and Bookkeeping category nationally.

In 2008, there were a total of 11,289,001 jobs in New York. The average annual income was $48,809 in 2008, up from $47,628 in 2007. The unemployment rate in New York was 8.4% in 2009, which has grown by 3.1% since the previous year. Roughly 27.4% of New York residents have college degrees, which is higher than the national average.

The top industries in New York include securities contracts intermediation, investment banking dealing, and apparel, piece goods, and notions merchant wholesalers. Notable tourist attractions include the Asian American Arts Centre, the 77 Gallery Limited, and the Abigail Adams Smith Museum.

CITIES WITH Gaming Cashier OPPORTUNITIES IN New York


JOB DESCRIPTION: Gaming Cashier

Gaming Cashier video from the State of New Jersey Dept. of Labor and Workforce Development

In general, gaming cashiers conduct financial transactions for patrons in gaming establishments. They also may reconcile daily summaries of transactions to balance books.

Every day, gaming cashiers are expected to be able to deal with basic arithmetic problems. They need to see details at a very fine level of focus. It is also important that they evaluate problems as they arise.

Similar jobs with educational opportunities in New York include:

  • Accounts Receivable Specialist. Locate and notify customers of delinquent accounts by mail, telephone, or personal visit to solicit payment. Duties include receiving payment and posting amount to customer's account; preparing statements to credit department if customer fails to respond; initiating repossession proceedings or service disconnection; keeping records of collection and status of accounts.
  • Bank Teller. Receive and pay out money. Keep records of money and negotiable instruments involved in a financial institution's various transactions.
  • Bookkeeper. Compute, classify, and record numerical data to keep financial records complete. Perform any combination of routine calculating, posting, and verifying duties to obtain primary financial data for use in maintaining accounting records. May also check the accuracy of figures, calculations, and postings pertaining to business transactions recorded by other workers.
  • Clerk. Compile data, compute fees and charges, and prepare invoices for billing purposes. Duties include computing costs and calculating rates for goods, services, and shipment of goods; posting data; and keeping other relevant records. May involve use of computer or typewriter, calculator, and adding and bookkeeping machines.
  • Payroll Machine Operator. Operate machines that automatically perform mathematical processes, such as addition, subtraction, and division, to calculate and record billing, accounting, and other numerical data. Duties include operating special billing machines to prepare statements, bills, and invoices, and operating bookkeeping machines to copy and post data, make computations, and compile records of transactions.
  • Statement Clerk. Prepare and distribute bank statements to customers, answer inquiries, and reconcile discrepancies in records and accounts.

LOCATION INFORMATION: New York

New York
New York photo by William Warby

New York has a population of 19,541,453, which has grown by 2.98% over the past 10 years. Nicknamed the "Empire State," its capital is Albany, though its most populous city is New York. In 2008, there were a total of 11,289,001 jobs in New York. The average annual income was $48,809 in 2008, up from $47,628 the preceding year. The unemployment rate in New York was 8.4% in 2009, which has grown by 3.1% since the previous year. Approximately 27.4% of New York residents have college degrees, which is higher than the national average.

The top industries in New York include securities contracts intermediation, investment banking dealing, and apparel, piece goods, and notions merchant wholesalers. Notable tourist attractions include the Abigail Adams Smith Museum, the Asian American Arts Centre, and the Anthology Film Archives Administration.