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Career and Education Opportunities for Atmospheric Scientists in New Jersey

New Jersey has a population of 8,707,739, which has grown by 3.49% in the last 10 years. Nicknamed the "Garden State," its capital is Trenton, though its most populous city is Newark.

The national trend for atmospheric scientists sees this job pool growing by about 14.7% over the next eight years. In general, atmospheric scientists investigate atmospheric phenomena and interpret meteorological data gathered by surface and air stations, satellites, and radar to prepare reports and forecasts for public and other uses.

The income of an atmospheric scientist is about $51 per hour or $106,810 yearly on average in New Jersey. In the U.S. as a whole, their income is about $39 hourly or $81,290 yearly on average. Atmospheric scientists earn more than people working in the category of Physical Sciences generally in New Jersey and more than people in the Physical Sciences category nationally. Jobs in this field include: hurricane tracker, storm chaser, and science and operations officer .

In 2008, there were a total of 5,176,293 jobs in New Jersey. The average annual income was $51,473 in 2008, up from $50,364 the previous year. The unemployment rate in New Jersey was 9.2% in 2009, which has grown by 3.7% since the previous year. About 29.8% of New Jersey residents have college degrees, which is higher than the national average.

The top industries in New Jersey include wholesale trade, durable goods merchant wholesalers, and drugs' sundries merchant wholesalers. Notable tourist destinations include the Smithsonian Institution, the Newark Museum, and the Morris Museum.

CITIES WITH Atmospheric Scientist OPPORTUNITIES IN New Jersey


JOB DESCRIPTION: Atmospheric Scientist

Atmospheric Scientist video from the State of New Jersey Dept. of Labor and Workforce Development

In general, atmospheric scientists investigate atmospheric phenomena and interpret meteorological data gathered by surface and air stations, satellites, and radar to prepare reports and forecasts for public and other uses.

Every day, atmospheric scientists are expected to be able to articulate ideas and problems. They need to listen to and understand others in meetings. It is also important that they read and understand documents and reports.

Similar jobs with educational opportunities in New Jersey include:

  • Astronomer. Observe, research, and interpret celestial and astronomical phenomena to increase basic knowledge and apply such information to practical problems.
  • Chemist. Conduct qualitative and quantitative chemical analyses or chemical experiments in laboratories for quality or process control or to develop new products or knowledge.
  • Environmental Health and Safety Specialist. Conduct research or perform investigation for the purpose of identifying, abating, or eliminating sources of pollutants or hazards that affect either the environment or the health of the population. Utilizing knowledge of various scientific disciplines may collect, synthesize, and take action based on data derived from measurements or observations of air, food, and other sources.
  • Geographic Information Systems Analyst. Study nature and use of areas of earth's surface, relating and interpreting interactions of physical and cultural phenomena. Conduct research on physical aspects of a region, including land forms, climates, soils, plants and animals, and conduct research on the spatial implications of human activities within a given area, including social characteristics, economic activities, and political organization, as well as researching interdependence between regions at scales ranging from local to global.
  • Geological Specialist. Study the composition, structure, and other physical aspects of the earth. May use geological, physics, and mathematics knowledge in exploration for oil, gas, or underground water; or in waste disposal, land reclamation, or other environmental problems. May study the earth's internal composition, atmospheres, and its magnetic, electrical, and gravitational forces. Includes mineralogists, crystallographers, and seismologists.
  • Hydrologist. Research the distribution, circulation, and physical properties of underground and surface waters; study the form and intensity of precipitation, its rate of infiltration into the soil, movement through the earth, and its return to the ocean and atmosphere.

LOCATION INFORMATION: New Jersey

New Jersey
New Jersey photo by Derek Jensen

New Jersey has a population of 8,707,739, which has grown by 3.49% in the last 10 years. Nicknamed the "Garden State," its capital is Trenton, though its most populous city is Newark. In 2008, there were a total of 5,176,293 jobs in New Jersey. The average annual income was $51,473 in 2008, up from $50,364 the previous year. The unemployment rate in New Jersey was 9.2% in 2009, which has grown by 3.7% since the previous year. Roughly 29.8% of New Jersey residents have college degrees, which is higher than the national average.

The top industries in New Jersey include wholesale trade, durable goods merchant wholesalers, and drugs' sundries merchant wholesalers. Notable tourist attractions include the Morris Museum, the New Jersey Historical Society, and the A P Personal Limo.