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Career and Education Opportunities for Athletic Scouts in Las Vegas, Nevada

Athletic scouts can find both educational opportunities and jobs in the Las Vegas, Nevada area. There are currently 870 jobs for athletic scouts in Nevada and this is projected to grow 32% to 1,140 jobs by 2016. This is better than the nation as a whole, where employment opportunities for athletic scouts are expected to grow by about 24.8%. In general, athletic scouts instruct or coach groups or individuals in the fundamentals of sports.

The average wage in the general category of Sports jobs is $24,920 per year in Nevada, and an average of $30,850 per year nationwide. Incomes for athletic scouts are the same as in the overall category of Sports in Nevada, and not quite as good as the overall Sports category nationally. People working as athletic scouts can fill a number of jobs, such as: professional sports scout, riding teacher, and swimming instructor.

There are nineteen schools of higher education in the Las Vegas area, including one within twenty-five miles of Las Vegas where you can get a degree to start your career as an athletic scout. The most common level of education for athletic scouts is a Bachelor's degree. You can expect to spend about four years training to become an athletic scout if you already have a high school diploma.

CAREER DESCRIPTION: Athletic Scout

Athletic Scout video from the State of New Jersey Dept. of Labor and Workforce Development

In general, athletic scouts instruct or coach groups or individuals in the fundamentals of sports. They also demonstrate techniques and methods of participation.

Athletic scouts formulate, organize, and conduct practice sessions. They also furnish training direction and motivation in order to ready athletes for games and/or tours. Equally important, athletic scouts have to keep abreast of changing rules and philosophies relevant to their sport. They are often called upon to adjust coaching techniques, on the basis of the strengths and weaknesses of athletes. They are expected to instruct individuals or groups in sports rules and performance principles, such as specific ways of moving the body or feet, to attain desired results. Finally, athletic scouts design and arrange competition schedules and programs.

Every day, athletic scouts are expected to be able to visualize how things come together and can be organized. They need to articulate ideas and problems.

It is important for athletic scouts to file scouting reports that detail player assessments, furnish recommendations on athlete recruitment, and identify locations and individuals to be targeted for future recruitment efforts. They are often called upon to identify and recruit potential athletes, arranging and offering incentives such as athletic scholarships. They also explain and demonstrate the use of sports and training equipment. They are sometimes expected to serve as organizer or referee for outdoor and indoor games, such as volleyball and soccer. Somewhat less frequently, athletic scouts are also expected to instruct individuals or groups in sports rules and performance principles, such as specific ways of moving the body or feet, to attain desired results.

Athletic scouts sometimes are asked to formulate and direct physical conditioning programs that will enable athletes to attain maximum performance. They also have to be able to formulate strategies and choose team members for individual games or sports seasons and keep records of athlete and opposing team performance. And finally, they sometimes have to serve as organizer or referee for outdoor and indoor games, such as volleyball and soccer.

Like many other jobs, athletic scouts must be able to take change and lead and be reliable.

EDUCATIONAL OPPORTUNITIES: Athletic Scout Training

University of Nevada-Las Vegas - Las Vegas, NV

University of Nevada-Las Vegas, 4505 S Maryland Pky, Las Vegas, NV 89154. University of Nevada-Las Vegas is a large university located in Las Vegas, Nevada. It is a public school with primarily 4-year or above programs. It has 28,618 students and an admission rate of 73%. University of Nevada-Las Vegas has 2 areas of study related to Athletic Scout. They are:

  • Physical Education Teaching and Coaching, bachelor's degree, master's degree, and doctor's degree which graduated twenty, eleven, and two students respectively in 2008.
  • Sport and Fitness Administration/Management, bachelor's degree which graduated 9 students in 2008.

CERTIFICATIONS

ACA Instructor: As an ACA Instructor, you are certified to teach a body of knowledge including all the skills, maneuvers and information required in canoeing, kayaking, and rafting.

For more information, see the American Canoe Association website.

Certified Health Fitness Specialist: The ACSM Certified Health Fitness Specialist (HFS) is a degreed health and fitness professional qualified to pursue a career in university, corporate, commercial, hospital, and community settings.

For more information, see the American College of Sports Medicine website.

Sports Nutrition: The optimum way for you or your clients to get the most out of their workouts and feel their best is to develop an energizing, performance-enhancing nutrition plan, tailored to their body's specific needs.

For more information, see the American Fitness Professionals and Associates website.

Sport Safety Training (6 1/2 hours): The American Red Cross and the United States Olympic Committee have joined forces to develop an exciting coach for coaches who want to keep their athletes safe.

For more information, see the American Red Cross website.

Seasonal Equestrian Staff Certification: The Seasonal Equestrian Staff Certification (SESC) was developed to meet the needs of seasonal riding program operators, such as summer camps, youth organizations, guest ranches and trail program operators.

For more information, see the Certified Horsemanship Association website.

Functional Trainer: Functional training is a complete system of athletic development that focuses on training the body the way it will be used in competition, making it the most efficient and effective form of training today.

For more information, see the International Fitness Professional Association website.

Sports Conditioning Specialist: The IFPA Sports Conditioning Specialist Certification(s) presents principles and practices from twenty-two of the finest and most respected strength and conditioning coaches.

For more information, see the International Fitness Professional Association website.

Flexibility Coach: You want to be at the "top-of-your-game," and the IFPA Certified Flexibility Coach gives you tools to set you apart.

For more information, see the International Fitness Professional Association website.

Boxing Level I: This 1 day certification provides an overview of the theoretical knowledge and practical skill necessary to teach a safe and effective Boxing and or Kick Boxing class.

For more information, see the International Sports Conditioning Association website.

Kick Boxing Level I: This 1 day certification provides an overview of the theoretical knowledge and practical skill necessary to teach a safe and effective Boxing and or Kick Boxing class.

For more information, see the International Sports Conditioning Association website.

Personal Training: This 2 day certification involves a combination of lectures, discussion groups and hands-on practical sessions.

For more information, see the International Sports Conditioning Association website.

Youth Fitness Trainer: Youth fitness training is one of the fastest-growing segments in the health club and fitness industry.

For more information, see the International Sports Sciences Association website.

LICENSES

Athlete's Agent

Phone: (702) 486-2440
Website: Secretary of State Securities Division

LOCATION INFORMATION: Las Vegas, Nevada

Las Vegas, Nevada
Las Vegas, Nevada photo by Lasvegaslover

Las Vegas is located in Clark County, Nevada. It has a population of over 558,383, which has grown by 16.7% over the last ten years. The cost of living index in Las Vegas, 91, is below the national average. New single-family homes in Las Vegas are priced at $111,300 on average, which is far less than the state average. In 2008, 1,085 new homes were constructed in Las Vegas, down from 2,356 the previous year.

The top three industries for women in Las Vegas are accommodation and food services, arts, entertainment, and recreation, and health care. For men, it is construction, accommodation and food services, and arts, entertainment, and recreation. The average commute to work is about 25 minutes. More than 18.2% of Las Vegas residents have a bachelor's degree, which is higher than the state average. The percentage of residents with a graduate degree, 6.5%, is higher than the state average.

The unemployment rate in Las Vegas is 13.3%, which is greater than Nevada's average of 12.6%.

The percentage of Las Vegas residents that are affiliated with a religious congregation, 36.2%, is less than the national average but more than the state average. The most common religious groups are the Catholic Church, the LDS (Mormon) Church and the Southern Baptist Convention.

Las Vegas is home to the Tule Springs and the Union Pacific Station as well as Jaycee Park and Dexter Park. Shopping centers in the area include Spanish Oaks Shopping Center, Wonderland East Shopping Center and Shadow Hills Shopping Center. Visitors to Las Vegas can choose from Doubletree Club Las Vegas, The Las Vegas Gambler and MGM Grand Hotel Casino-The City of Entertainment - Human Resources for temporary stays in the area.