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Career and Education Opportunities for Crop and Livestock Managers in Nebraska

Nebraska has a population of 1,796,619, which has grown by 4.99% over the past decade. Nicknamed the "Cornhusker State," its capital is Lincoln, though its biggest city is Omaha.

The national trend for crop and livestock managers sees this job pool growing by about 5.9% over the next eight years. In general, crop and livestock managers direct and coordinate, through subordinate supervisory personnel, activities of workers engaged in agricultural crop production for corporations, cooperatives, or other owners.

Crop and livestock managers earn about $25 per hour or $52,490 annually on average in Nebraska and about $27 hourly or $56,230 annually on average nationally. Compared with people working in the overall category of Farm and Livestock, people working as crop and livestock managers in Nebraska earn the same. They earn more than people working in the overall category of Farm and Livestock nationally. Crop and livestock managers work in a variety of jobs, including: agriculture manager, fruit or nut farmer, and grain farmer.

In 2008, there were a total of 1,253,549 jobs in Nebraska. The average annual income was $39,182 in 2008, up from $37,899 the previous year. The unemployment rate in Nebraska was 4.6% in 2009, which has grown by 1.3% since the previous year. Approximately 23.7% of Nebraska residents have college degrees, which is lower than the national average.

The top industries in Nebraska include food manufacturing, animal slaughtering, and animal slaughtering. Notable tourist attractions include the General Crook House, the Museum Kaneko, and the Mormon Trail Center.

CITIES WITH Crop and Livestock Manager OPPORTUNITIES IN Nebraska


JOB DESCRIPTION: Crop and Livestock Manager

In general, crop and livestock managers direct and coordinate, through subordinate supervisory personnel, activities of workers engaged in agricultural crop production for corporations, cooperatives, or other owners.

Every day, crop and livestock managers are expected to be able to read and understand documents and reports. They need to articulate ideas and problems. It is also important that they listen to and understand others in meetings.

Similar jobs with educational opportunities in Nebraska include:

  • Aquaculture Director. Direct and coordinate, through subordinate supervisory personnel, activities of workers engaged in fish hatchery production for corporations, cooperatives, or other owners.
  • Farm Rancher. On an ownership or rental basis, operate farms, or other agricultural production establishments which produce crops, horticultural specialties, or animal specialties. May plant, cultivate, harvest, perform post-harvest activities, and market crops and livestock; may hire, train, and supervise farm workers or supervise a farm labor contractor; may prepare cost, production, and other records. May maintain and operate machinery and perform physical work.
  • Industrial Production Manager. Plan, direct, or coordinate the work activities and resources necessary for manufacturing products in accordance with cost, quality, and quantity specifications.

LOCATION INFORMATION: Nebraska

Nebraska
Nebraska photo by Matthew Trump

Nebraska has a population of 1,796,619, which has grown by 4.99% over the past 10 years. Nicknamed the "Cornhusker State," its capital is Lincoln, though its most populous city is Omaha. In 2008, there were a total of 1,253,549 jobs in Nebraska. The average annual income was $39,182 in 2008, up from $37,899 in 2007. The unemployment rate in Nebraska was 4.6% in 2009, which has grown by 1.3% since the previous year. Approximately 23.7% of Nebraska residents have college degrees, which is lower than the national average.

The top industries in Nebraska include food manufacturing, animal slaughtering, and animal slaughtering. Notable tourist destinations include the Douglas County Historical Society, the Museum Kaneko, and the Joslyn Art Museum.