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Career and Education Opportunities for Aerodynamics Engineers in St. Paul, Minnesota

If you want to be an aerodynamics engineer, the St. Paul, Minnesota area offers many opportunities both for education and employment. Currently, 150 people work as aerodynamics engineers in Minnesota. This is expected to grow by 22% to about 180 people by 2016. This is better than the national trend for aerodynamics engineers, which sees this job pool growing by about 10.4% over the next eight years. In general, aerodynamics engineers perform a variety of engineering work in designing, constructing, and testing aircraft, missiles, and spacecraft.

A person working as an aerodynamics engineer can expect to earn about $34 per hour or $72,210 yearly on average in Minnesota and about $44 per hour or $92,520 per year on average in the U.S. as a whole. Earnings for aerodynamics engineers are not quite as good as earnings in the general category of Engineering in Minnesota and better than general Engineering category earnings nationally. Jobs in this field include: designer, test analyst, and airframe design engineer.

There are seventy-seven schools of higher education in the St. Paul area, including one within twenty-five miles of St. Paul where you can get a degree to start your career as an aerodynamics engineer. Given that the most common education level for aerodynamics engineers is a Bachelor's degree, it will take about four years to learn to be an aerodynamics engineer if you already have a high school diploma.

CAREER DESCRIPTION: Aerodynamics Engineer

Aerodynamics Engineer video from the State of New Jersey Dept. of Labor and Workforce Development

In general, aerodynamics engineers perform a variety of engineering work in designing, constructing, and testing aircraft, missiles, and spacecraft. They also may conduct basic and applied research to evaluate adaptability of materials and equipment to aircraft design and manufacture.

Every day, aerodynamics engineers are expected to be able to read and understand documents and reports. They need to think through problems and come up with general rules. It is also important that they listen to and understand others in meetings.

It is important for aerodynamics engineers to direct and schedule efforts of engineering or technical personnel designing or testing of aircraft or aerospace products. They are often called upon to formulate conceptual layout of aeronautical or aerospace products or systems to fit customer requirements. They also analyze project requests and proposals and engineering data to establish feasibility and production time of aerospace or aeronautical product. They are sometimes expected to inspect performance reports and documentation from customers and field engineers, and inspect malfunctioning or damaged products to establish problem. Somewhat less frequently, aerodynamics engineers are also expected to evaluate and approve selection of vendors by study of past performance and new advertisements.

Aerodynamics engineers sometimes are asked to direct research and development programs. and formulate and direct efforts concerned with investigating and resolving customers' reports of technical problems with aircraft or aerospace vehicles. And finally, they sometimes have to evaluate and approve selection of vendors by study of past performance and new advertisements.

Like many other jobs, aerodynamics engineers must be thorough and dependable and be reliable.

Similar jobs with educational opportunities in St. Paul include:

  • Agricultural Engineer. Apply knowledge of engineering technology and biological science to agricultural problems concerned with power and machinery, electrification, structures, soil and water conservation, and processing of agricultural products.
  • Biomedical Engineer. Apply knowledge of engineering, biology, and biomechanical principles to the design, development, and evaluation of biological and health systems and products, such as artificial organs, prostheses, instrumentation, medical information systems, and health management and care delivery systems.
  • Chemical Engineer. Design chemical plant equipment and devise processes for manufacturing chemicals and products, such as gasoline, synthetic rubber, and pulp, by applying principles and technology of chemistry, physics, and engineering.
  • Civil Engineer. Perform engineering duties in planning, designing, and overseeing construction and maintenance of building structures, and facilities, such as roads, railroads, airports, bridges, harbors, channels, dams, irrigation projects, pipelines, power plants, water and sewage systems, and waste disposal units. Includes architectural, structural, and geo-technical engineers.
  • Computer Engineer. Research, design, and test computer or computer-related equipment for commercial, industrial, or scientific use. May supervise the manufacturing and installation of computer or computer-related equipment and components.
  • Electrical Engineer. Design, develop, or supervise the manufacturing and installation of electrical equipment, components, or systems for commercial, industrial, or scientific use.
  • Electronics Engineer. Research, design, and test electronic components and systems for commercial, industrial, or scientific use utilizing knowledge of electronic theory and materials properties. Design electronic circuits and components for use in fields such as telecommunications, aerospace guidance and propulsion control, acoustics, or instruments and controls.
  • Industrial Engineer. Design, develop, and evaluate integrated systems for managing industrial production processes including human work factors, quality control, inventory control, logistics and material flow, cost analysis, and production coordination.
  • Industrial Engineering Technician. Apply engineering theory and principles to problems of industrial layout or manufacturing production, usually under the direction of engineering staff. May study and record time, motion, and speed involved in performance of production, maintenance, and other worker operations for such purposes as establishing standard production rates or improving efficiency.
  • Manufacturing Engineer. Apply knowledge of materials and engineering theory and methods to design, integrate, and improve manufacturing systems or related processes. May work with commercial or industrial designers to refine product designs to increase producibility and decrease costs.
  • Materials Engineer. Evaluate materials and develop machinery and processes to manufacture materials for use in products that must meet specialized design and performance specifications. Develop new uses for known materials. Includes those working with composite materials or specializing in one type of material, such as graphite, metal and metal alloys, ceramics and glass, plastics and polymers, and naturally occurring materials.
  • Mechanical Engineer. Perform engineering duties in planning and designing tools, engines, and other mechanically functioning equipment. Oversee installation, operation, and repair of such equipment as centralized heat, gas, and steam systems.

EDUCATIONAL OPPORTUNITIES: Aerodynamics Engineer Training

University of Minnesota-Twin Cities - Minneapolis, MN

University of Minnesota-Twin Cities, 100 Church Street SE, Minneapolis, MN 55455-0213. University of Minnesota-Twin Cities is a large university located in Minneapolis, Minnesota. It is a public school with primarily 4-year or above programs. It has 51,140 students and an admission rate of 53%. University of Minnesota-Twin Cities has bachelor's degree, master's degree, and doctor's degree programs in Aerospace, Aeronautical and Astronautical Engineering which graduated seventy-two, thirteen, and eleven students respectively in 2008.


Planning and Scheduling Professional: The PSP certification is to recognize specialists who meet a demanding set of planning and scheduling criteria by a rigorous examination, experience, education and ethical qualificaion.

For more information, see the AACE International (Association for the Advancement of Cost Engineering through total cost management) website.

Geometric Dimensioning & Tolerancing Professional - Technologist: ASME GDTP Certification provides the means to recognize proficiency in the understanding and application of the geometric dimensioning and tolerancing (GD&T) principles expressed in the ASME Y14.

For more information, see the American Society of Mechanical Engineers International website.



Licensing agency: Architecture, Engineering, Land Surveying, Landscape Architecture,
Address: Geoscience and Interior Design (AELSLAGID), Minnesota Board of, Minnesota Board of AELSLAGID, 85 7th Place East, Suite 160, St. Paul, MN 55101

Phone: (651) 296-2388
Website: Architecture, Engineering, Land Surveying, Landscape Architecture, Geoscience and Interior Design (AELSLAGID), Minnesota Board of Minnesota Board of AELSLAGID


St. Paul, Minnesota
St. Paul, Minnesota photo by Gridge

St. Paul is located in Ramsey County, Minnesota. It has a population of over 279,590, which has shrunk by 2.6% in the past ten years. The cost of living index in St. Paul, 99, is near the national average. New single-family homes in St. Paul are valued at $213,300 on average, which is well below the state average. In 2008, thirty new homes were built in St. Paul, down from seventy-four the previous year.

The three most popular industries for women in St. Paul are educational services, health care, and finance and insurance. For men, it is educational services, professional, scientific, and technical services, and construction. The average commute to work is about 21 minutes. More than 32.0% of St. Paul residents have a bachelor's degree, which is higher than the state average. The percentage of residents with a graduate degree, 12.0%, is higher than the state average.

The unemployment rate in St. Paul is 7.4%, which is greater than Minnesota's average of 7.0%.

The percentage of St. Paul residents that are affiliated with a religious congregation, 61.3%, is more than both the national and state average. Zion Church, Convent of the Visitation and Saint Paul Cathedral are some of the churches located in St. Paul. The most prominent religious groups are the Catholic Church, the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America and the Baptist General Conference.

St. Paul is home to the Saint Paul Orphange and the Wilder Center as well as Terrace Park and East View Playground.