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Career and Education Opportunities for Insurance Underwriters in Minneapolis, Minnesota

Many educational and employment opportunities exist for insurance underwriters in the Minneapolis, Minnesota area. There are currently 1,470 working insurance underwriters in Minnesota; this should grow 8% to 1,590 working insurance underwriters in the state by 2016. This is better than the national trend for insurance underwriters, which sees this job pool shrinking by about 4.1% over the next eight years. In general, insurance underwriters review individual applications for insurance to evaluate degree of risk involved and determine acceptance of applications.

Insurance underwriters earn approximately $26 hourly or $54,540 yearly on average in Minnesota. Nationally they average about $27 hourly or $56,790 yearly. Incomes for insurance underwriters are better than in the overall category of Accounting and Auditing in Minnesota, and better than the overall Accounting and Auditing category nationally. Insurance underwriters work in a variety of jobs, including: commercial lines underwriter, account underwriter, and underwriting manager.

The Minneapolis area is home to eighty schools of higher education, including three within twenty-five miles of Minneapolis where you can get a degree as an insurance underwriter. Insurance underwriters usually hold a Bachelor's degree, so it will take about four years to learn to be an insurance underwriter if you already have a high school diploma.

CAREER DESCRIPTION: Insurance Underwriter

Insurance Underwriter video from the State of New Jersey Dept. of Labor and Workforce Development

In general, insurance underwriters review individual applications for insurance to evaluate degree of risk involved and determine acceptance of applications.

Insurance underwriters decline excessive risks. They also write to field representatives and others to obtain further data or explain company underwriting policies. Equally important, insurance underwriters have to inspect company records to establish amount of insurance in force. They are often called upon to decrease value of policy when risk is substandard and specify applicable endorsements. Finally, insurance underwriters authorize reinsurance of policies when risks are high.

Every day, insurance underwriters are expected to be able to read and understand documents and reports. It is also important that they articulate ideas and problems.

It is important for insurance underwriters to evaluate possibility of losses due to catastrophe or excessive insurance. They are often called upon to examine documents to establish degree of risk from such factors as applicant financial standing and value and state of property. Somewhat less frequently, insurance underwriters are also expected to write to field representatives and others to obtain further data or explain company underwriting policies.

And finally, they sometimes have to decrease value of policy when risk is substandard and specify applicable endorsements.

Like many other jobs, insurance underwriters must have exceptional integrity and be thorough and dependable.

Similar jobs with educational opportunities in Minneapolis include:

  • Accountant. Analyze financial information and prepare financial reports to determine or maintain records of assets, liabilities, profit and loss, tax liability, or other financial activities within an organization.
  • Assessor. Appraise real and personal property to determine its fair value. May assess taxes in accordance with prescribed schedules.
  • Auditor. Examine and analyze accounting records to determine financial status of establishment and prepare financial reports concerning operating procedures.
  • Budget Analyst. Examine budget estimates for completeness, accuracy, and conformance with procedures and regulations. Analyze budgeting and accounting reports for the purpose of maintaining expenditure controls.
  • Cost Analyst. Prepare cost estimates for product manufacturing, construction projects, or services to aid management in bidding on or determining price of product or service. May specialize according to particular service performed or type of product manufactured.
  • Credit Analyst. Analyze current credit data and financial statements of individuals or firms to determine the degree of risk involved in extending credit or lending money. Prepare reports with this credit information for use in decision-making.
  • Financial Analyst. Conduct quantitative analyses of information affecting investment programs of public or private institutions.
  • Financial Examiner. Enforce or ensure compliance with laws and regulations governing financial and securities institutions and financial and real estate transactions. May examine, verify correctness of, or establish authenticity of records.
  • Income Tax Advisor. Prepare tax returns for individuals or small businesses but do not have the background or responsibilities of an accredited or certified public accountant.
  • Insurance Appraiser. Appraise automobile or other vehicle damage to determine cost of repair for insurance claim settlement and seek agreement with automotive repair shop on cost of repair. Prepare insurance forms to indicate repair cost or cost estimates and recommendations.
  • Loan Counselor. Provide guidance to prospective loan applicants who have problems qualifying for traditional loans. Guidance may include determining the best type of loan and explaining loan requirements or restrictions.
  • Loan Officer. Evaluate, authorize, or recommend approval of commercial, real estate, or credit loans. Advise borrowers on financial status and methods of payments. Includes mortgage loan officers and agents, collection analysts, loan servicing officers, and loan underwriters.
  • Personal Financial Planner. Advise clients on financial plans utilizing knowledge of tax and investment strategies, securities, and real estate. Duties include assessing clients' assets, liabilities, and financial objectives to establish investment strategies.
  • Real Estate Appraiser. Appraise real property to determine its value for purchase, sales, or loan purposes.
  • Tax Examiner. Determine tax liability or collect taxes from individuals or business firms according to prescribed laws and regulations.

EDUCATIONAL OPPORTUNITIES: Insurance Underwriter Training

University of Minnesota-Twin Cities - Minneapolis, MN

University of Minnesota-Twin Cities, 100 Church Street SE, Minneapolis, MN 55455-0213. University of Minnesota-Twin Cities is a large university located in Minneapolis, Minnesota. It is a public school with primarily 4-year or above programs. It has 51,140 students and an admission rate of 53%. University of Minnesota-Twin Cities has a bachelor's degree program in Insurance which graduated twenty-one students in 2008.

University of St Thomas - Saint Paul, MN

University of St Thomas, 2115 Summit Ave, Saint Paul, MN 55105-1078. University of St Thomas is a large university located in Saint Paul, Minnesota. It is a private not-for-profit school with primarily 4-year or above programs. It has 10,960 students and an admission rate of 81%. University of St Thomas has a master's degree program in Insurance which graduated one student in 2008.

Walden University - Minneapolis, MN

Walden University, 155 Fifth Ave S, Suite 100, Minneapolis, MN 55401. Walden University is a large university located in Minneapolis, Minnesota. It is a private for-profit school with primarily 4-year or above programs and has 34,907 students. Walden University has a master's degree program in Insurance which graduated twenty-nine students in 2008.

CERTIFICATIONS

Chartered Property Casualty Underwriter: More than 65,000 people have earned the CPCU professional designation.

For more information, see the American Institute for CPCU and Insurance Institute of America website.

Associate in Commerical Underwriting: Enhance your professional confidence by building a strong foundation in underwriting principles with the Institutes' Associate in Commercial Underwriting program.

For more information, see the American Institute for CPCU and Insurance Institute of America website.

Associate in Risk Management: The Insurance Institute of America's newly revised Associate in Risk Management (ARM) designation program will teach your employees the practical, relevant skills they need to help manage risk at all levels of your company.

For more information, see the American Institute for CPCU and Insurance Institute of America website.

Associate in Premium Auditing: The Associate in Premium Auditing program provides a sold foundation in essential auditing, accounting, and insurance principles.

For more information, see the American Institute for CPCU and Insurance Institute of America website.

Associate in Insurance Services: The Associate in Insurance Services program is a nationally recognized educational program designed specifically for insurance personnel.

For more information, see the American Institute for CPCU and Insurance Institute of America website.

Associate in Risk Management for Public Entities: The Insurance Institute of America's newly revised Associate in Risk Management (ARM) designation program will teach your employees the practical, relevant skills they need to help manage risk at all levels of your company.

For more information, see the American Institute for CPCU and Insurance Institute of America website.

Risk Management for Public Entities: Understand the unique nature of the public sector.

For more information, see the American Institute for CPCU and Insurance Institute of America website.

Certified Pension Consultant: The Certified Pension Consultant (CPC) credential is designed for benefits professionals working in plan administration, pension actuarial administration, insurance, and financial planning.

For more information, see the American Society of Pension Professionals and Actuaries website.

LOCATION INFORMATION: Minneapolis, Minnesota

Minneapolis, Minnesota
Minneapolis, Minnesota photo by BenFranske

Minneapolis is situated in Hennepin County, Minnesota. It has a population of over 382,605. The cost of living index in Minneapolis, 101, is near the national average. New single-family homes in Minneapolis are priced at $451,300 on average, which is far greater than the state average. In 2008, forty-five new homes were constructed in Minneapolis, down from one hundred fifteen the previous year.

The top three industries for women in Minneapolis are health care, educational services, and accommodation and food services. For men, it is educational services, professional, scientific, and technical services, and accommodation and food services. The average commute to work is about 22 minutes. More than 37.4% of Minneapolis residents have a bachelor's degree, which is higher than the state average. The percentage of residents with a graduate degree, 13.1%, is higher than the state average.

The unemployment rate in Minneapolis is 7.0%, which is the same as Minnesota's average of 7.0%.

The percentage of Minneapolis residents that are affiliated with a religious congregation, 57.7%, is more than the national average but less than the state average. The largest religious groups are the Catholic Church, the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America and the United Methodist Church.

Minneapolis is home to the Saint Josephs Orphanage and the Hiawatha Municipal Golf Course as well as Beards Plaisance and Mississippi Park. Visitors to Minneapolis can choose from COE Mansion Carriage House, Radisson Hotel Metrodome and Best Western Kelly Inn for temporary stays in the area.