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Career and Education Opportunities for Forensic Investigators in Michigan

Michigan has a population of 9,969,727, which has grown by 0.31% in the last 10 years. Nicknamed the "Great Lakes State," its capital is Lansing, though its most populous city is Detroit.

About 400 people are currently employed as forensic investigators in Michigan. By 2016, this is expected to grow 28% to about 510 people employed. This is better than the national trend for forensic investigators, which sees this job pool growing by about 19.6% over the next eight years. In general, forensic investigators collect, identify, and analyze physical evidence related to criminal investigations.

Income for forensic investigators is about $23 hourly or $49,350 per year on average in Michigan. Nationally, their income is about $23 per hour or $49,860 annually. Earnings for forensic investigators are better than earnings in the general category of Life Science Technical in Michigan and better than general Life Science Technical category earnings nationally. Forensic investigators work in a variety of jobs, including: keeler polygraph operator, forensic engineer, and crime scene technician.

In 2008, there were a total of 5,397,807 jobs in Michigan. The average annual income was $34,953 in 2008, up from $34,185 the preceding year. The unemployment rate in Michigan was 13.6% in 2009, which has grown by 5.3% since the previous year. Approximately 21.8% of Michigan residents have college degrees, which is lower than the national average.

The top industries in Michigan include transportation equipment manufacturing, motor vehicle manufacturing, and motor vehicle parts manufacturing. Notable tourist attractions include the Detroit City, the Dossin Great Lakes Museum, and the Curtis Museum Inc.

CITIES WITH Forensic Investigator OPPORTUNITIES IN Michigan


JOB DESCRIPTION: Forensic Investigator

Forensic Investigator video from the State of New Jersey Dept. of Labor and Workforce Development

In general, forensic investigators collect, identify, and analyze physical evidence related to criminal investigations. They also perform tests on weapons or substances, such as fiber, hair, and tissue to determine significance to investigation.

Every day, forensic investigators are expected to be able to listen to and understand others in meetings. They need to think through problems and come up with general rules. It is also important that they solve different sorts of problems in different ways depending upon circumstances.

Similar jobs with educational opportunities in Michigan include:

  • Environmental Technician. Perform laboratory and field tests to monitor the environment and investigate sources of pollution, including those that affect health. Under direction of an environmental scientist or specialist, may collect samples of gases, soil, and other materials for testing and take corrective actions as assigned.
  • Forestry and Wildlife Manager. Compile data pertaining to size, content, and other characteristics of forest tracts, under direction of foresters; train and lead forest workers in forest propagation, fire prevention and suppression. May assist conservation scientists in managing, improving, and protecting rangelands and wildlife habitats, and help provide technical assistance regarding the conservation of soil, water, and related natural resources.

LOCATION INFORMATION: Michigan

Michigan
Michigan photo by Jjegers

Michigan has a population of 9,969,727, which has grown by 0.31% over the past 10 years. Nicknamed the "Great Lakes State," its capital is Lansing, though its most populous city is Detroit. In 2008, there were a total of 5,397,807 jobs in Michigan. The average annual income was $34,953 in 2008, up from $34,185 in 2007. The unemployment rate in Michigan was 13.6% in 2009, which has grown by 5.3% since the previous year. About 21.8% of Michigan residents have college degrees, which is lower than the national average.

The top industries in Michigan include transportation equipment manufacturing, motor vehicle manufacturing, and motor vehicle parts manufacturing. Notable tourist destinations include the Bullock Edwards & Associates, the Detroit Historical Society, and the Charles H Wright Museum of African American Histry.