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Career and Education Opportunities for Broadcast Technicians in Grand Rapids, Michigan

There are many career and education opportunities for broadcast technicians in the Grand Rapids, Michigan area. There are currently 1,270 jobs for broadcast technicians in Michigan and this is projected to grow by 11% to about 1,410 jobs by 2016. This is better than the nation as a whole, where employment opportunities for broadcast technicians are expected to grow by about 1.8%. Broadcast technicians generally set up, operate, and maintain the electronic equipment used to transmit radio and television programs.

Broadcast technicians earn about $15 hourly or $32,190 per year on average in Michigan and about $15 per hour or $32,900 per year on average nationally. Incomes for broadcast technicians are not quite as good as in the overall category of Media Technical in Michigan, and not quite as good as the overall Media Technical category nationally. Broadcast technicians work in a variety of jobs, including: video operator, control engineer, and videotape operator.

There are nineteen schools of higher education in the Grand Rapids area, including one within twenty-five miles of Grand Rapids where you can get a degree to start your career as a broadcast technician. Broadcast technicians usually hold a high school diploma or GED, so it will take only a short time to learn to be a broadcast technician if you already have a high school diploma.

CAREER DESCRIPTION: Broadcast Technician

Broadcast Technician video from the State of New Jersey Dept. of Labor and Workforce Development

In general, broadcast technicians set up, operate, and maintain the electronic equipment used to transmit radio and television programs. They also control audio equipment to regulate volume level and quality of sound during radio and television broadcasts.

Broadcast technicians report equipment problems, insure that repairs are made, and make emergency repairs to equipment when needed and possible. They also monitor strength and reliability of incoming and outgoing signals, and adjust equipment as needed to maintain quality broadcasts. Equally important, broadcast technicians have to observe monitors and talk with station personnel to establish audio and video levels and to ascertain that programs are airing. They are often called upon to control audio apparatus to regulate the volume and sound quality during radio and television broadcasts. They are expected to regulate the fidelity and contrast of video transmissions, using video console control panels. Finally, broadcast technicians record sound onto tape or film for radio or television, checking its quality and making adjustments where needed.

Every day, broadcast technicians are expected to be able to distinguish between colors. They need to evaluate problems as they arise. It is also important that they listen to and understand others in meetings.

It is important for broadcast technicians to decide on sources from which programming will be received, or through which programming will be transmitted. They are often called upon to instruct trainees in how to use television production equipment, how to film events, and how to copy and edit graphics or sound onto videotape. They also maintain programming logs, as required by station management and the Federal Communications Commission. They are sometimes expected to substitute programs in cases where signals fail. Somewhat less frequently, broadcast technicians are also expected to assemble and operate portable field transmission equipment outside the studio.

They also have to be able to ready reports outlining past and future programs, including content And finally, they sometimes have to schedule programming, or read television programming logs to establish which programs are to be recorded or aired.

Like many other jobs, broadcast technicians must be thorough and dependable and be reliable.

Similar jobs with educational opportunities in Grand Rapids include:

  • Audio Visual Technician. Set up or set up and operate audio and video equipment including microphones, sound speakers, video screens, projectors, video monitors, recording equipment, connecting wires and cables, sound and mixing boards, and related electronic equipment for concerts, sports events, meetings and conventions, presentations, and news conferences. May also set up and operate associated spotlights and other custom lighting systems.
  • Camera Operator. Operate television, video, or motion picture camera to photograph images or scenes for various purposes, such as TV broadcasts, advertising, or motion pictures.
  • Film or Videotape Editor. Edit motion picture soundtracks, film, and video.
  • Photographer. Photograph persons, subjects, or other commercial products. May develop negatives and produce finished prints.
  • Sound Engineer. Operate machines and equipment to record, synchronize, or reproduce music, voices, or sound effects in sporting arenas, theater productions, or movie and video productions.

EDUCATIONAL OPPORTUNITIES: Broadcast Technician Training

Muskegon Community College - Muskegon, MI

Muskegon Community College, 221 S Quarterline Rd, Muskegon, MI 49442-1432. Muskegon Community College is a small college located in Muskegon, Michigan. It is a public school with primarily 2-year programs and has 4,747 students. Muskegon Community College has 2 areas of study related to Broadcast Technician. They are:

  • Radio and Television Broadcasting Technology/Technician, associate's degree.
  • Audiovisual Communications Technologies/Technicians, Other Specialties, less than one year.


RF Line Sweeping: RF Line Sweeping, or FDR, Frequency Domain Reflectometry, certification by the Electronics Technicians Association, Internationa, has two assessments: The 16 category knowledge written multiple-choice examination, and the practical hands-on physical abilities and skills demonstration documented during a formal training course.

For more information, see the ETA International website.

Associate Certified Electronics Technician: Knowledge areas include: Electrical Theory, Electronic Components, Soldering-Desoldering & Tools, Block Diagrams - Schematics - Wiring Diagrams, Cabling, Power Supplies, test Equipment & Measurements, Safety Precautions, Mathematics & Formulas, Radio Communication Technology, Electronic Circuits: Series & Parallel, Amplifiers, Interfacing of Electronics Products, Digital Concepts & Circuitry, Computer Electronics, Computer Applications, Audio & Video Systems, Optical Electronics, Telecommunications Basics, Technician Work Procedures.

For more information, see the ETA International website.

Certified Technology Specialist-Installation: A Certified Technology Specialist Installation (CTS-I) installs and maintains audiovisual systems by following specifications,.

For more information, see the InfoComm International website.

Certified Broadcast Networking Technologist: This certification is designed for persons who wish to demonstrate a basic familiarity with networking hardware as utilized in business and audio/video applications in broadcast facilities.

For more information, see the Society of Broadcast Engineers, Inc. website.

Certified Broadcast Radio Engineer : The candidate for Certified Broadcast Radio Engineer must have five (5) years of suitable experience in broadcast engineering or related technology and must achieve a passing grade on the proficiency examination.

For more information, see the Society of Broadcast Engineers, Inc. website.

Certifed AM Directional Specialist: The SBE Program of Certification designed the AM Directional Specialist Certification to help evaluate an individual's ability to perform the necessary tasks to keep facilities operating properly.

For more information, see the Society of Broadcast Engineers, Inc. website.

LOCATION INFORMATION: Grand Rapids, Michigan

Grand Rapids, Michigan
Grand Rapids, Michigan photo by Grguy2011

Grand Rapids is located in Kent County, Michigan. It has a population of over 193,396, which has shrunk by 2.2% over the last ten years. The cost of living index in Grand Rapids, 81, is well below the national average. New single-family homes in Grand Rapids cost $98,700 on average, which is far less than the state average. In 2008, forty-three new homes were built in Grand Rapids, down from ninety-two the previous year.

The three most popular industries for women in Grand Rapids are health care, educational services, and accommodation and food services. For men, it is construction, transportation equipment, and educational services. The average travel time to work is about 19 minutes. More than 23.8% of Grand Rapids residents have a bachelor's degree, which is lower than the state average. The percentage of residents with a graduate degree, 8.0%, is lower than the state average.

The unemployment rate in Grand Rapids is 15.4%, which is greater than Michigan's average of 14.3%.

The percentage of Grand Rapids residents that are affiliated with a religious congregation, 52.9%, is more than both the national and state average. Church of Jesus Christ, Immanuel Church and Trinity Church are among the churches located in Grand Rapids. The most prominent religious groups are the Catholic Church, the Christian Reformed Church in North America and the Reformed Church in America.

Grand Rapids is home to the Kent Country Club and the Walker Juvenile Court as well as Comstock Riverside Park and Richmond Park. Visitors to Grand Rapids can choose from Hampton Inn Grand Rapids, Hampton Inn Grand Rapids/North- Mi and Hampton Inn Fax for temporary stays in the area.