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Career and Education Opportunities for Property Managers in Maryland

Maryland has a population of 5,699,478, which has grown by 7.61% in the last 10 years. Nicknamed the "Old Line State," its capital is Annapolis, though its biggest city is Baltimore.

Currently, 5,330 people work as property managers in Maryland. This is expected to grow by 12% to about 5,940 people by 2016. This is better than the national trend for property managers, which sees this job pool growing by about 8.4% over the next eight years. In general, property managers plan, direct, or coordinate selling, buying, or governance activities of commercial, industrial, or residential real estate properties.

Property managers earn about $31 per hour or $66,190 per year on average in Maryland and about $22 hourly or $46,130 per year on average nationally. Compared with people working in the overall category of Specialized Management, people working as property managers in Maryland earn less. They earn less than people working in the overall category of Specialized Management nationally. People working as property managers can fill a number of jobs, such as: real estate investor, apartment house manager, and community manager.

In 2008, there were a total of 3,471,985 jobs in Maryland. The average annual income was $48,164 in 2008, up from $46,922 the preceding year. The unemployment rate in Maryland was 7.0% in 2009, which has grown by 2.6% since the previous year. About 31.4% of Maryland residents have college degrees, which is higher than the national average.

The top industries in Maryland include engineering services, radio broadcasting communications equipment manufacturing, and photofinishing. Notable tourist attractions include the Dorfman Museum Figures Inc, the Baltimore Civil War Museum, and the Museum Hall.

CITIES WITH Property Manager OPPORTUNITIES IN Maryland


JOB DESCRIPTION: Property Manager

Property Manager video from the State of New Jersey Dept. of Labor and Workforce Development

In general, property managers plan, direct, or coordinate selling, buying, or governance activities of commercial, industrial, or residential real estate properties.

Every day, property managers are expected to be able to articulate ideas and problems. They need to listen to and understand others in meetings. It is also important that they read and understand documents and reports.

Similar jobs with educational opportunities in Maryland include:

  • Construction Foreman. Plan, direct, or budget, usually through subordinate supervisory personnel, activities concerned with the construction and maintenance of structures, facilities, and systems. Participate in the conceptual development of a construction project and oversee its organization, scheduling, and implementation.
  • Legislator. Develop laws and statutes at the Federal, State, or local level.
  • Natural Resources Specialist. Plan, direct, or coordinate activities in such fields as life sciences, physical sciences, and research and development in these fields.
  • Purchasing Manager. Plan, direct, or coordinate the activities of buyers, purchasing officers, and related workers involved in purchasing materials, products, and services.
  • Social Service Coordinator. Plan, organize, or coordinate the activities of a social service program or community outreach organization. Oversee the program or organization's budget and policies regarding participant involvement, program requirements, and benefits. Work may involve directing social workers, counselors, or probation officers.

LOCATION INFORMATION: Maryland

Maryland
Maryland photo by Abhijit Tembhekar

Maryland has a population of 5,699,478, which has grown by 7.61% in the last 10 years. Nicknamed the "Old Line State," its capital is Annapolis, though its largest city is Baltimore. In 2008, there were a total of 3,471,985 jobs in Maryland. The average annual income was $48,164 in 2008, up from $46,922 the preceding year. The unemployment rate in Maryland was 7.0% in 2009, which has grown by 2.6% since the previous year. Roughly 31.4% of Maryland residents have college degrees, which is higher than the national average.

The top industries in Maryland include engineering services, radio broadcasting communications equipment manufacturing, and photofinishing. Notable tourist attractions include the Dorfman Museum Figures Inc, the Baltimore Civil War Museum, and the National Park Service.