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Career and Education Opportunities for Archaeologists

In general, archaeologists conduct research to reconstruct record of past human life and culture from human remains, artifacts, and structures recovered through excavation, underwater recovery, or other means of discovery.

Select a state from the map below to find education opportunities to begin your Archaeologist career.


Highlighted states contain educational opportunities in Social Sciences

JOB DESCRIPTION: Archaeologist

Archaeologist video from the State of New Jersey Dept. of Labor and Workforce Development

Archaeologists write and publish reports that record a site's history and artifact analysis results, along with recommendations for conserving and interpreting findings. They also compare findings from one site with archeological data from other sites to discover similarities or differences. Equally important, archaeologists have to research or assess sites of past societies and cultures in search of answers to specific research questions. They are often called upon to study objects and structures recovered by excavations to pinpoint and authenticate them and to interpret their significance. They are expected to lead field training sites and train field staff and volunteers in excavation methods. Finally, archaeologists develop artifact typologies to organize and make sense of past material cultures.

Every day, archaeologists are expected to be able to articulate ideas and problems. They need to write clearly and communicate well. It is also important that they piece together evidence to, in some sense, diagnose what is going on in a situation.