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Foundry and Metal Work: Career and Education Opportunities in Indiana

Foundry and Metal Work: Metal and Foundry workers forge, shape and weld metals under difficult conditions. They work at all stages of metal and part production from the initial forging of the alloys to the final construction of finished metal products.

Indiana photo by Jasssmit

Indiana has a population of 6,423,113, which has grown by 5.63% over the past decade. Nicknamed the "Hoosier State," Indiana's capital and most populous city is Indianapolis. In 2008, there were a total of 3,718,148 jobs in Indiana. The average annual income was $34,543 in 2008, up from $33,702 the previous year. The unemployment rate in Indiana was 10.1% in 2009, which has grown by 4.3% since the previous year. Roughly 19.4% of Indiana residents have college degrees, which is lower than the national average.

The top industries in Indiana include manufacturing, primary metal manufacturing, and iron mills manufacturing.

CITIES WITH Foundry and Metal Work OPPORTUNITIES IN Indiana

Featured Online Colleges

Everest University
Liberty University
American InterContinental University Online

CAREERS WITHIN Foundry and Metal Work

Buffing Machine Operator

Buffing Machine Operators set up, operate, or tend grinding and related tools that remove excess material or burrs from surfaces, sharpen edges or corners, or buff, hone, or polish metal or plastic work pieces. Buffing Machine Operators need to test products and systems both during and after development to evaluate and catch faults as they occur. They also need to pay attention to ongoing situations and monitor them as they develop.
Heat Treating Equipment Operator

Heat Treating Equipment Operators set up, operate, or tend heating equipment, such as heat-treating furnaces, flame-hardening machines, induction machines, or vacuum equipment to temper, harden, or heat-treat metal or plastic objects. Heat Treating Equipment Operators need to attend to equipment so as to monitor and adjust its activity. They also need to attend to equipment so as to monitor and adjust its activity.
Layout Technician

Layout Technicians lay out reference points and dimensions on metal or plastic stock or workpieces, such as sheets, plates, or machine parts, for further processing. Layout Technicians need to respond to the actions of other and coordinate activities with them. They also need to use core mathematical skills in problem solving.
Tool and Die Maker

Tool and Die Makers analyze specifications, lay out metal stock, set up and operate machine tools, and fit and assemble parts to make and repair dies, cutting tools, and machinists' hand tools. Tool and Die Makers need to use core mathematical skills in problem solving. They also need to determine which tools and techniques should be applied to solve a problem or deal with a situation.