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Career and Education Opportunities for Sports Trainers in Indiana

Indiana has a population of 6,423,113, which has grown by 5.63% in the last 10 years. Nicknamed the "Hoosier State," Indiana's capital and largest city is Indianapolis.

About 430 people are currently employed as sports trainers in Indiana. By 2016, this is expected to grow 24% to 530 people employed. This is not quite as good as the nation as a whole, where employment opportunities for sports trainers are expected to grow by about 37.0%. In general, sports trainers evaluate, advise, and treat athletes to assist recovery from injury, avoid injury, or maintain peak physical fitness.

The average wage in the general category of Athletic and Occupational jobs is $42 per hour or $81,018 per year in Indiana, and an average of $44 per hour or $84,458 per year nationwide. Incomes for sports trainers are not quite as good as in the overall category of Athletic and Occupational in Indiana, and not quite as good as the overall Athletic and Occupational category nationally. Sports trainers work in a variety of jobs, including: sports athletic trainer, fitness specialist, and sports medicine trainer.

In 2008, there were a total of 3,718,148 jobs in Indiana. The average annual income was $34,543 in 2008, up from $33,702 in 2007. The unemployment rate in Indiana was 10.1% in 2009, which has grown by 4.3% since the previous year. About 19.4% of Indiana residents have college degrees, which is lower than the national average.

The top industries in Indiana include manufacturing, primary metal manufacturing, and iron mills manufacturing.

CITIES WITH Sports Trainer OPPORTUNITIES IN Indiana


JOB DESCRIPTION: Sports Trainer

Sports Trainer video from the State of New Jersey Dept. of Labor and Workforce Development

In general, sports trainers evaluate, advise, and treat athletes to assist recovery from injury, avoid injury, or maintain peak physical fitness.

Every day, sports trainers are expected to be able to evaluate problems as they arise. They need to articulate ideas and problems. It is also important that they piece together evidence to, in some sense, diagnose what is going on in a situation.

Similar jobs with educational opportunities in Indiana include:

  • Licensed Practical Nurse. Care for ill, injured, or disabled persons in hospitals, nursing homes, and similar institutions. May work under the supervision of a registered nurse. Licensing required.
  • Occupational Safety and Health Inspector. Review, evaluate, and analyze work environments and design programs and procedures to control, eliminate, and prevent disease or injury caused by chemical, physical, and biological agents or ergonomic factors. May conduct inspections and enforce adherence to laws and regulations governing the health and safety of individuals. May be employed in the public or private sector.
  • Physical Therapist. Assess, plan, organize, and participate in rehabilitative programs that improve mobility, relieve pain, and decrease or prevent deformity of patients suffering from disease or injury.
  • Recreational Therapist. Plan, direct, or coordinate medically-approved recreation programs for patients in hospitals, nursing homes, or other institutions. Activities include sports, trips, and arts and crafts. May assess a patient condition and recommend appropriate recreational activity.
  • Respiratory Therapist. Assess, treat, and care for patients with breathing disorders. Assume primary responsibility for all respiratory care modalities, including the supervision of respiratory therapy technicians. Initiate and conduct therapeutic procedures; maintain patient records; and select, assemble, and operate equipment.

LOCATION INFORMATION: Indiana

Indiana
Indiana photo by Jasssmit

Indiana has a population of 6,423,113, which has grown by 5.63% over the past decade. Nicknamed the "Hoosier State," Indiana's capital and most populous city is Indianapolis. In 2008, there were a total of 3,718,148 jobs in Indiana. The average annual income was $34,543 in 2008, up from $33,702 the previous year. The unemployment rate in Indiana was 10.1% in 2009, which has grown by 4.3% since the previous year. Roughly 19.4% of Indiana residents have college degrees, which is lower than the national average.

The top industries in Indiana include manufacturing, primary metal manufacturing, and iron mills manufacturing.