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Career and Education Opportunities for Electrical Line Workers in Joliet, Illinois

If you want to be an electrical line worker, the Joliet, Illinois area offers many opportunities both for education and employment. Currently, 4,140 people work as electrical line workers in Illinois. This is expected to grow by 5% to 4,370 people by 2016. This is better than the nation as a whole, where employment opportunities for electrical line workers are expected to grow by about 4.5%. In general, electrical line workers install or repair cables or wires used in electrical power or distribution systems.

The income of an electrical line worker is about $32 hourly or $67,400 yearly on average in Illinois. In the U.S. as a whole, their income is about $26 per hour or $55,100 per year on average. Earnings for electrical line workers are better than earnings in the general category of Electrical in Illinois and better than general Electrical category earnings nationally.

There are 132 schools of higher education in the Joliet area, including one within twenty-five miles of Joliet where you can get a degree to start your career as an electrical line worker. Electrical line workers usually hold a high school diploma or GED, so you can expect to spend only a short time studying to be an electrical line worker if you already have a high school diploma.

CAREER DESCRIPTION: Electrical Line Worker

Electrical Line Worker video from the State of New Jersey Dept. of Labor and Workforce Development

In general, electrical line workers install or repair cables or wires used in electrical power or distribution systems. They also may erect poles and light or heavy duty transmission towers.

Electrical line workers climb poles or use truck-mounted buckets to access equipment. They also dig holes, using augers, and set poles, using cranes and power equipment. Equally important, electrical line workers have to drive vehicles equipped with tools and materials to job sites. They are often called upon to remove or straighten damaged poles. They are expected to attach cross-arms and auxiliary apparatus to poles before installing them. Finally, electrical line workers test conductors, in line with electrical diagrams and specifications, to identify corresponding conductors and to inhibit incorrect connections.

Every day, electrical line workers are expected to be able to see details at a very fine level of focus. They need to evaluate problems as they arise. It is also important that they control objects and devices with precise control.

It is important for electrical line workers to lay underground cable directly in trenches, or string it through conduit running through the trenches. They are often called upon to clean and splice corresponding conductors by twisting ends together or by joining ends with metal clamps and soldering connections. They also cut trenches for laying underground cables, using trenchers and cable plows. They are sometimes expected to cut and peel lead sheathing and insulation from faulty or newly installed cables and conduits before splicing. Somewhat less frequently, electrical line workers are also expected to set up watt-hour meters and connect service drops between power lines and consumers' facilities.

They also have to be able to identify faulty sectionalizing devices or wiring, using wiring diagrams and electrical-testing instruments and open switches or attach grounding devices to remove electrical hazards from disturbed or fallen lines or to enable fixes. And finally, they sometimes have to travel in trucks and airplanes to inspect lines for freedom from obstruction and adequacy of insulation.

Like many other jobs, electrical line workers must be reliable and be thorough and dependable.

Similar jobs with educational opportunities in Joliet include:

EDUCATIONAL OPPORTUNITIES: Electrical Line Worker Training

City Colleges of Chicago-Kennedy-King College - Chicago, IL

City Colleges of Chicago-Kennedy-King College, 6301 S Halsted St, Chicago, IL 60621-2709. City Colleges of Chicago-Kennedy-King College is a medium sized college located in Chicago, Illinois. It is a public school with primarily 2-year programs and has 6,873 students. City Colleges of Chicago-Kennedy-King College has a one to two year program in Lineworker which graduated thirty students in 2008.

CERTIFICATIONS

Certified Customer Service Specialist: An individual who successfully passes ETA's World Class CSS Certification exam is professionally recognized as having the ability to uphold the interpersonal and business standards necessary in today's workplace.

For more information, see the ETA International website.

LOCATION INFORMATION: Joliet, Illinois

Joliet, Illinois
Joliet, Illinois photo by Joliet82

Joliet is situated in Will County, Illinois. It has a population of over 146,125, which has grown by 37.6% in the past ten years. The cost of living index in Joliet, 100, is near the national average. New single-family homes in Joliet are priced at $172,400 on average, which is far less than the state average. In 2008, two hundred forty-four new homes were constructed in Joliet, down from seven hundred sixty-nine the previous year.

The three most popular industries for women in Joliet are health care, educational services, and finance and insurance. For men, it is construction, public administration, and administrative and support and waste management services. The average commute to work is about 29 minutes. More than 18.6% of Joliet residents have a bachelor's degree, which is lower than the state average. The percentage of residents with a graduate degree, 5.7%, is lower than the state average.

The unemployment rate in Joliet is 12.4%, which is greater than Illinois's average of 10.5%.

The percentage of Joliet residents that are affiliated with a religious congregation, 53.9%, is more than the national average but less than the state average. All Nation Church of God in Christ, All Saints Greek Orthodox Church and Holy Cross Catholic Church are all churches located in Joliet. The largest religious groups are the Catholic Church, the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America and the United Methodist Church.

Joliet is home to the Will County Courthouse and the Timber Ridge Business Park as well as Joliet East Side Historic District and Rock Run County Forest Preserve. Shopping centers in the area include Joliet Mall Shopping Center, Caton Crossing Town Square Shopping Center and Twin Oaks Place Shopping Center. Visitors to Joliet can choose from Great Escapes Travel, Hampton Inn Joliet/I-80- IL and Bel-Air Motel for temporary stays in the area.