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Career and Education Opportunities for Medical Scientists in Delaware

Delaware has a population of 885,122, which has grown by 12.96% over the past decade. Nicknamed the "First State," its capital is Dover, though its biggest city is Wilmington.

There are currently 350 jobs for medical scientists in Delaware and this is projected to grow 19% to 420 jobs by 2016. This is not quite as good as the national trend for medical scientists, which sees this job pool growing by about 40.4% over the next eight years. In general, medical scientists conduct research dealing with the understanding of human diseases and the improvement of human health.

A person working as a medical scientist can expect to earn about $39 per hour or $82,550 per year on average in Delaware and about $34 hourly or $72,590 yearly on average in the U.S. as a whole. Medical scientists earn more than people working in the category of Life Sciences generally in Delaware and more than people in the Life Sciences category nationally. People working as medical scientists can fill a number of jobs, such as: nanotechnologist, cancer researcher, and scientist.

In 2008, there were a total of 553,149 jobs in Delaware. The average annual income was $40,375 in 2008, up from $39,932 in 2007. The unemployment rate in Delaware was 8.1% in 2009, which has grown by 3.2% since the previous year. About 25.0% of Delaware residents have college degrees, which is higher than the national average.

The top industries in Delaware include nondurable goods merchant wholesalers, management of companies, and offices of other holding companies. Notable tourist attractions include the New Castle County Public Libraries, the Delaware Sports Museum and Hall of Fame, and the Business History & Technology Museum.

CITIES WITH Medical Scientist OPPORTUNITIES IN Delaware


JOB DESCRIPTION: Medical Scientist

Medical Scientist video from the State of New Jersey Dept. of Labor and Workforce Development

In general, medical scientists conduct research dealing with the understanding of human diseases and the improvement of human health. They also engage in clinical investigation or other research, production, or related activities.

Every day, medical scientists are expected to be able to piece together evidence to, in some sense, diagnose what is going on in a situation. They need to listen to and understand others in meetings. It is also important that they read and understand documents and reports.

Similar jobs with educational opportunities in Delaware include:

  • Biologist. Research or study basic principles of plant and animal life, such as origin, relationship, and functions.
  • Epidemiologist. Investigate and describe the determinants and distribution of disease, disability, and other health outcomes and develop the means for prevention and control.
  • Food Technologist. Use chemistry, microbiology, and other sciences to study the principles underlying the processing and deterioration of foods; analyze food content to determine levels of vitamins, fat, and protein; discover new food sources; research ways to make processed foods safe, palatable, and healthful; and apply food science knowledge to determine best ways to process, package, and distribute food.
  • Forester. Manage forested lands for economic, recreational, and conservation purposes. May inventory the type, amount, and location of standing timber, appraise the timber's worth, negotiate the purchase, and draw up contracts for procurement. May determine how to conserve wildlife habitats, creek beds, and soil stability, and how best to comply with environmental regulations. May devise plans for planting and growing new trees, monitor trees for healthy growth, and determine the best time for harvesting. Develop forest management plans for public and privately-owned forested lands.
  • Microbiologist. Investigate the growth, structure, and other characteristics of microscopic organisms, such as bacteria, algae, or fungi. Includes medical microbiologists who study the relationship between organisms and disease or the effects of antibiotics on microorganisms.
  • Natural Resource Manager. Research or study range land management practices to provide sustained production of forage, livestock, and wildlife.
  • Park Ranger. Plan, develop, and conduct programs to inform public of historical, natural, and scientific features of national, state, or local park.
  • Scientist. Study the chemical composition and physical principles of living cells and organisms, their electrical and mechanical energy, and related phenomena. May conduct research to further understanding of the complex chemical combinations and reactions involved in metabolism, reproduction, and heredity. May determine the effects of foods, drugs, and other substances on tissues and vital processes of living organisms.
  • Soil Conservation Technician. Plan and develop coordinated practices for soil erosion control, soil and water conservation, and sound land use.
  • Soil Scientist. Conduct research in breeding, physiology, and management of crops and agricultural plants, their growth in soils, and control of pests; or study the chemical, physical, and mineralogical composition of soils as they relate to plant or crop growth. May classify and map soils and investigate effects of alternative practices on soil and crop productivity.
  • Zoologist. Study the origins, behavior, and life processes of animals and wildlife. May specialize in wildlife research and management, including the collection and analysis of biological data to determine the environmental effects of present and potential use of land and water areas.

LOCATION INFORMATION: Delaware

Delaware
Delaware photo by Tim Kiser

Delaware has a population of 885,122, which has grown by 12.96% over the past decade. Nicknamed the "First State," its capital is Dover, though its largest city is Wilmington. In 2008, there were a total of 553,149 jobs in Delaware. The average annual income was $40,375 in 2008, up from $39,932 the previous year. The unemployment rate in Delaware was 8.1% in 2009, which has grown by 3.2% since the previous year. Approximately 25.0% of Delaware residents have college degrees, which is higher than the national average.

The top industries in Delaware include nondurable goods merchant wholesalers, management of companies, and offices of other holding companies. Notable tourist attractions include the Arden Craft Shop Museum, the Delaware Center for the Contemporary Arts, and the Historical Society of Delaware.