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Career and Education Opportunities for Paperhangers

In general, paperhangers cover interior walls and ceilings of rooms with decorative wallpaper or fabric, or attach advertising posters on surfaces, such as walls and billboards. They also duties include removing old materials from surface to be papered.

Select a state from the map below to find education opportunities to begin your Paperhanger career.


Highlighted states contain educational opportunities in Painting and Finishing Work


Paperhanger video from the State of New Jersey Dept. of Labor and Workforce Development

Paperhangers smooth strips or sections of paper with brushes or rollers to remove wrinkles and bubbles and to smooth joints. They also clear away old paper, using water, steam machines, or solvents and scrapers. Equally important, paperhangers have to position strips or sections of paper on surfaces, aligning section edges and patterns. They are often called upon to check finished wallcoverings for proper alignment and neatness of seams. They are expected to apply adhesives to the backs of paper strips, using brushes, or dunk strips of prepasted wallcovering in water; wiping off any excess adhesive. Finally, paperhangers assemble equipment such as pasteboards and scaffolds.

Every day, paperhangers are expected to be able to twist and stretch their arms and legs to get work done. They need to see details at a very fine level of focus. It is also important that they move quickly in order to hold onto or control objects and devices.