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Painting and Coating: Career and Education Opportunities in Connecticut

Painting and Coating: Workers in Painting and Coating perform the last stages of the manufacturing and production process. Through the control of complex staged processes or by hand, they provide the finishing touches to products before they are released into the world.

Connecticut photo by Ragesoss

Connecticut has a population of 3,518,288, which has grown by 3.31% over the past 10 years. Nicknamed the "Constitution State," its capital is Hartford, though its biggest city is Bridgeport. In 2008, there were a total of 2,279,011 jobs in Connecticut. The average annual income was $56,245 in 2008, up from $55,629 the previous year. The unemployment rate in Connecticut was 8.2% in 2009, which has grown by 2.6% since the previous year. Roughly 31.4% of Connecticut residents have college degrees, which is higher than the national average.

The top industries in Connecticut include petroleum bulk stations, sales financing, and paper product merchant wholesalers.

CITIES WITH Painting and Coating OPPORTUNITIES IN Connecticut

Featured Online Colleges

Everest University
Liberty University
American InterContinental University Online

CAREERS WITHIN Painting and Coating

Auto Body Painter

Auto Body Painters operate or tend painting machines to paint surfaces of transportation equipment, such as automobiles, buses, and airplanes. Auto Body Painters need to pay attention to ongoing situations and monitor them as they develop. They also need to respond to the actions of other and coordinate activities with them.
Decorative Painter

Decorative Painters paint, coat, or decorate articles, such as furniture, glass, or leather. Decorative Painters need to pay attention to ongoing situations and monitor them as they develop. They also need to listen well to others and take in their information and issues.
Photographic Processing Machine Operator

Photographic Processing Machine Operators operate photographic processing machines, such as photographic printing machines, film developing machines, and mounting presses. Photographic Processing Machine Operators need to train others in tasks and process. They also need to read and understand what has been read.