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Career and Education Opportunities for Forestry and Wildlife Managers in Thornton, Colorado

There is a wide variety of career and education opportunities for forestry and wildlife managers in the Thornton, Colorado area. Currently, 1,010 people work as forestry and wildlife managers in Colorado. This is expected to shrink 3% to 980 people by 2016. This is not quite as good as the national trend for forestry and wildlife managers, which sees this job pool growing by about 8.6% over the next eight years. Forestry and wildlife managers generally compile data pertaining to size, content, and other characteristics of forest tracts, under direction of foresters; train and lead forest workers in forest propagation, fire prevention and suppression.

Income for forestry and wildlife managers is about $14 per hour or $30,690 annually on average in Colorado. Nationally, their income is about $15 hourly or $32,000 annually. Forestry and wildlife managers earn less than people working in the category of Life Science Technical generally in Colorado and less than people in the Life Science Technical category nationally. People working as forestry and wildlife managers can fill a number of jobs, such as: soil conservation technician, forester, and tree warden.

The Thornton area is home to fifty-nine schools of higher education, including two within twenty-five miles of Thornton where you can get a degree as a forestry and wildlife manager. The most common level of education for forestry and wildlife managers is a Bachelor's degree. You can expect to spend about four years training to become a forestry and wildlife manager if you already have a high school diploma.

CAREER DESCRIPTION: Forestry and Wildlife Manager

Forestry and Wildlife Manager video from the State of New Jersey Dept. of Labor and Workforce Development

In general, forestry and wildlife managers compile data pertaining to size, content, and other characteristics of forest tracts, under direction of foresters; train and lead forest workers in forest propagation, fire prevention and suppression. They also may assist conservation scientists in managing, improving, and protecting rangelands and wildlife habitats, and help provide technical assistance regarding the conservation of soil, water, and related natural resources.

Every day, forestry and wildlife managers are expected to be able to articulate ideas and problems. They need to listen to and understand others in meetings.

It is important for forestry and wildlife managers to oversee forest protection efforts, including fire control, fire crew training, and coordination of fire detection and public education programs. They are often called upon to patrol park or forest areas to safeguard resources and avoid damage. They also train and lead forest and conservation staff in seasonal efforts. They are sometimes expected to decide on and mark trees for thinning or logging, drawing detailed plans that include access roads. Somewhat less frequently, forestry and wildlife managers are also expected to furnish technical support to forestry research programs in areas such as tree improvement, seed orchard operations, insect and disease surveys, or experimental forestry and forest engineering research.

Forestry and wildlife managers sometimes are asked to formulate and supervise development of access routes and forest roads. They also have to be able to survey and map access roads and forest areas such as burns, cut-over areas and timber sales sections and conduct laboratory or field experiments with plants, animals, insects, diseases and soils. And finally, they sometimes have to measure distances, clean site-lines, and record data to help survey crews.

Like many other jobs, forestry and wildlife managers must believe in cooperation and coordination and believe in an agile approach to problem solving and deal with change.

Similar jobs with educational opportunities in Thornton include:

  • Biological Sciences Technician. Assist biological and medical scientists in laboratories. Set up, operate, and maintain laboratory instruments and equipment, monitor experiments, and calculate and record results. May analyze organic substances, such as blood, food, and drugs.
  • Environmental Technician. Perform laboratory and field tests to monitor the environment and investigate sources of pollution, including those that affect health. Under direction of an environmental scientist or specialist, may collect samples of gases, soil, and other materials for testing and take corrective actions as assigned.

EDUCATIONAL OPPORTUNITIES: Forestry and Wildlife Manager Training

Red Rocks Community College - Lakewood, CO

Red Rocks Community College, 13300 W Sixth Ave, Lakewood, CO 80228-1255. Red Rocks Community College is a medium sized college located in Lakewood, Colorado. It is a public school with primarily 2-year programs and has 7,432 students. Red Rocks Community College has a less than one year and a one to two year program in Natural Resources Management and Policy, Other Specialties which graduated three and one students respectively in 2008.

Pickens Technical College - Aurora, CO

Pickens Technical College, 500 Airport Blvd, Aurora, CO 80011-9307. Pickens Technical College is a small college located in Aurora, Colorado. It is a public school with primarily less-than 2-year programs and has 1,066 students. Pickens Technical College has a less than one year program in Natural Resources Management and Policy, Other Specialties which graduated twenty students in 2008.

LOCATION INFORMATION: Thornton, Colorado

Thornton, Colorado
Thornton, Colorado photo by bonjourpeewee

Thornton is located in Adams County, Colorado. It has a population of over 113,429, which has grown by 37.7% over the last ten years. The cost of living index in Thornton, 94, is below the national average. New single-family homes in Thornton are priced at $176,300 on average, which is far less than the state average. In 2008, two hundred ninety-five new homes were constructed in Thornton, down from four hundred eighty-four the previous year.

The three big industries for women in Thornton are educational services, health care, and finance and insurance. For men, it is construction, professional, scientific, and technical services, and administrative and support and waste management services. The average commute to work is about 29 minutes. More than 19.9% of Thornton residents have a bachelor's degree, which is lower than the state average. The percentage of residents with a graduate degree, 4.8%, is lower than the state average.

The unemployment rate in Thornton is 6.3%, which is less than Colorado's average of 6.6%.

The percentage of Thornton residents that are affiliated with a religious congregation, 30.4%, is less than both the national and state average. The largest religious groups are the Catholic Church, the LDS (Mormon) Church and the Lutheran Church.