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Career and Education Opportunities for Medical Equipment Repairers in Santa Clara, California

Medical equipment repairers can find both educational opportunities and jobs in the Santa Clara, California area. Currently, 4,100 people work as medical equipment repairers in California. This is expected to grow 24% to about 5,100 people by 2016. This is not quite as good as the national trend for medical equipment repairers, which sees this job pool growing by about 27.2% over the next eight years. In general, medical equipment repairers test, adjust, or repair biomedical or electromedical equipment.

The income of a medical equipment repairer is about $22 hourly or $46,250 yearly on average in California. In the U.S. as a whole, their income is about $19 hourly or $41,520 yearly on average. Medical equipment repairers earn more than people working in the category of Specialized Equipment generally in California and more than people in the Specialized Equipment category nationally.

There are thirty-five schools of higher education in the Santa Clara area, including one within twenty-five miles of Santa Clara where you can get a degree to start your career as a medical equipment repairer. Given that the most common education level for medical equipment repairers is an Associate's, or other 2-year degree, you can expect to spend about two years studying to be a medical equipment repairer if you already have a high school diploma.

CAREER DESCRIPTION: Medical Equipment Repairer

Medical Equipment Repairer video from the State of New Jersey Dept. of Labor and Workforce Development

In general, medical equipment repairers test, adjust, or repair biomedical or electromedical equipment.

Medical equipment repairers examine and test malfunctioning medical and related equipment following manufacturers' specifications, using test and analysis instruments. They also disassemble malfunctioning equipment and remove, repair and replace faulty parts such as motors, clutches or transformers. Equally important, medical equipment repairers have to solder loose connections, using soldering iron. They are often called upon to test and calibrate parts and equipment following manufacturers' manuals and troubleshooting techniques, using hand tools, power tools and measuring devices. They are expected to perform preventive maintenance or service such as cleaning, lubricating and adjusting equipment. Finally, medical equipment repairers test and classify excess or in-use medical equipment and decide on serviceability, condition, and disposition in accordance with regulations.

Every day, medical equipment repairers are expected to be able to read and understand documents and reports. They need to visualize how things come together and can be organized. It is also important that they see details at a very fine level of focus.

It is important for medical equipment repairers to formulate and carry out work assignments, using blueprints, schematic drawings, technical manuals, wiring diagrams, and liquid and air flow sheets, following prescribed regulations and other instructions as required. They are often called upon to contribute expertise to evolve medical maintenance standard operating procedures. They also repair shop equipment and hospital equipment, including welding broken parts and replacing missing parts, or bring item into local shop for major fixes. They are sometimes expected to fabricate or substitute parts or major new items to modify apparatus to meet unique operational or research needs, working from job orders, sketches, modification orders, samples or discussions with operating officials. Somewhat less frequently, medical equipment repairers are also expected to supervise and advise subordinate personnel.

Medical equipment repairers sometimes are asked to compute power and space requirements for installing medical, dental or related equipment and install units to manufacturers' specifications. And finally, they sometimes have to examine and test malfunctioning medical and related equipment following manufacturers' specifications, using test and analysis instruments.

Like many other jobs, medical equipment repairers must be thorough and dependable and be reliable.

Similar jobs with educational opportunities in Santa Clara include:

  • Camera Repair Technician. Repair and adjust cameras and photographic equipment, including commercial video and motion picture camera equipment.
  • Household Appliance Repairer. Repair, adjust, or install all types of electric or gas household appliances, such as refrigerators, washers, and ovens.
  • Motorcycle Mechanic. Diagnose, adjust, or overhaul motorcycles, scooters, or similar motorized vehicles.
  • Vending Machine Mechanic. Install, service, or repair coin, vending, or amusement machines including video games, juke boxes, or slot machines.

EDUCATIONAL OPPORTUNITIES: Medical Equipment Repairer Training

San Jose City College - San Jose, CA

San Jose City College, 2100 Moorpark Ave, San Jose, CA 95128-2798. San Jose City College is a large college located in San Jose, California. It is a public school with primarily 2-year programs and has 11,574 students. San Jose City College has a two to four year program in Biomedical Technology/Technician.

LOCATION INFORMATION: Santa Clara, California

Santa Clara, California
Santa Clara, California photo by Coolcaesar

Santa Clara is located in Santa Clara County, California. It has a population of over 110,200, which has grown by 7.7% over the last ten years. The cost of living index in Santa Clara, 158, is far greater than the national average. New single-family homes in Santa Clara cost $196,500 on average, which is far less than the state average. In 2008, forty-three new homes were constructed in Santa Clara, down from eighty-five the previous year.

The top three industries for women in Santa Clara are computer and electronic products, professional, scientific, and technical services, and educational services. For men, it is computer and electronic products, professional, scientific, and technical services, and construction. The average commute to work is about 22 minutes. More than 42.4% of Santa Clara residents have a bachelor's degree, which is higher than the state average. The percentage of residents with a graduate degree, 16.6%, is higher than the state average.

The unemployment rate in Santa Clara is 10.9%, which is less than California's average of 12.3%.

The percentage of Santa Clara residents that are affiliated with a religious congregation, 43.2%, is less than both the national and state average. Peace Lutheran Church, Good News Community Church and Universal Church of the Master are some of the churches located in Santa Clara. The most prominent religious groups are the Catholic Church, the LDS (Mormon) Church and the Muslim Estimate.

Santa Clara is home to the Santa Clara Unified School District Office and the Santa Clara Municipal Golf Course as well as Westwood Acres Park and Washington Park. Shopping centers in the area include Moonlite Shopping Center, Fairway Glen Shopping Center and Youth Shopping Center.