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Career and Education Opportunities for Office Clerks in Roseville, California

Office clerks can find both educational opportunities and jobs in the Roseville, California area. About 409,600 people are currently employed as office clerks in California. By 2016, this is expected to grow by 15% to 472,700 people employed. This is better than the nation as a whole, where employment opportunities for office clerks are expected to grow by about 11.9%. Office clerks generally perform duties too varied and diverse to be classified in any specific office clerical occupation, requiring limited knowledge of office management systems and procedures.

Office clerks earn approximately $13 per hour or $28,020 annually on average in California. Nationally they average about $12 per hour or $25,320 per year. Earnings for office clerks are not quite as good as earnings in the general category of Clerical in California and not quite as good as general Clerical category earnings nationally.

The Roseville area is home to thirty-six schools of higher education, including two within twenty-five miles of Roseville where you can get a degree as an office clerk. Given that the most common education level for office clerks is a high school diploma or GED, it will take only a short time to learn to be an office clerk if you already have a high school diploma.

CAREER DESCRIPTION: Office Clerk

Office Clerk video from the State of New Jersey Dept. of Labor and Workforce Development

In general, office clerks perform duties too varied and diverse to be classified in any specific office clerical occupation, requiring limited knowledge of office management systems and procedures. They also clerical duties may be assigned in accordance with the office procedures of individual establishments and may include a combination of answering telephones, bookkeeping, typing or word processing, stenography, office machine operation, and filing.

Office clerks communicate with customers and other individuals to respond to questions, disseminate or explain data, take orders, and address complaints. They also answer telephones and take messages. Equally important, office clerks have to operate office machines, such as photocopiers and scanners, facsimile machines, voice mail systems, and personal computers. Finally, office clerks compile and file archives of office efforts and other efforts.

Every day, office clerks are expected to be able to listen to and understand others in meetings. They need to articulate ideas and problems. It is also important that they see details at a very fine level of focus.

It is important for office clerks to maintain and update filing, inventory and database systems, either manually or using a computer. They are often called upon to compute and proofread data and other data, such as archives or reports. They also open and route incoming mail and ready outgoing mail. They are sometimes expected to deliver messages and run errands. Somewhat less frequently, office clerks are also expected to process and ready documents.

Office clerks sometimes are asked to ready meeting agendas and record and transcribe minutes. They also have to be able to collect and disburse money, do basic bookkeeping, and complete banking transactions And finally, they sometimes have to communicate with customers and other individuals to respond to questions, disseminate or explain data, take orders, and address complaints.

Like many other jobs, office clerks must believe in cooperation and coordination and be reliable.

Similar jobs with educational opportunities in Roseville include:

  • Bank Teller. Receive and pay out money. Keep records of money and negotiable instruments involved in a financial institution's various transactions.
  • Bookkeeper. Compute, classify, and record numerical data to keep financial records complete. Perform any combination of routine calculating, posting, and verifying duties to obtain primary financial data for use in maintaining accounting records. May also check the accuracy of figures, calculations, and postings pertaining to business transactions recorded by other workers.
  • Broker Assistant. Perform clerical duties involving the purchase or sale of securities. Duties include writing orders for stock purchases and sales, computing transfer taxes, verifying stock transactions, accepting and delivering securities, tracking stock price fluctuations, computing equity, and keeping records of daily transactions and holdings.
  • Clerk. Compile data, compute fees and charges, and prepare invoices for billing purposes. Duties include computing costs and calculating rates for goods, services, and shipment of goods; posting data; and keeping other relevant records. May involve use of computer or typewriter, calculator, and adding and bookkeeping machines.
  • Correspondence Clerk. Compose letters in reply to requests for merchandise, damage claims, credit and other information, delinquent accounts, or unsatisfactory services. Duties may include gathering data to formulate reply and typing correspondence.
  • Courtroom Clerk. Perform clerical duties in court of law; prepare docket of cases to be called; secure information for judges; and contact witnesses, attorneys, and litigants to obtain information for court.
  • File Clerk. File correspondence, cards, and other records in alphabetical or numerical order or according to the filing system used. Locate and remove material from file when requested.
  • Insurance Claims Processor. Obtain information from insured or designated persons for purpose of settling claim with insurance carrier.
  • Insurance Processing Clerk. Process applications for, changes to, and cancellation of insurance policies. Duties include reviewing insurance applications to ensure that all questions have been answered, compiling data on insurance policy changes, changing policy records to conform to insured party's specifications, compiling data on lapsed insurance policies to determine automatic reinstatement according to company policies, canceling insurance policies as requested by agents, and verifying the accuracy of insurance company records.
  • Legal Secretary. Perform secretarial duties utilizing legal terminology, procedures, and documents. Prepare legal papers and correspondence, such as summonses, complaints, and subpoenas. May also assist with legal research.
  • Library Clerk. Compile records, sort and shelve books, and issue and receive library materials such as pictures, cards, slides and microfilm. Locate library materials for loan and replace material in shelving area, stacks, or files according to identification number and title. Register patrons to permit them to borrow books, periodicals, and other library materials.
  • License Clerk. Issue licenses or permits to qualified applicants. Obtain necessary information; record data; advise applicants on requirements; collect fees; and issue licenses. May conduct oral, written, or performance testing.
  • Loan Inspector. Interview loan applicants to elicit information; investigate applicants' backgrounds and verify references; prepare loan request papers; and forward findings, reports, and documents to appraisal department. Review loan papers to ensure completeness, and complete transactions between loan establishment, borrowers, and sellers upon approval of loan.
  • Municipal Clerk. Draft agendas and bylaws for town or city council; record minutes of council meetings; answer official correspondence; keep fiscal records and accounts; and prepare reports on civic needs.
  • Order Clerk. Receive and process incoming orders for materials, merchandise, or services such as repairs, installations, or rental of facilities. Duties include informing customers of receipt, prices, and delays; preparing contracts; and handling complaints.
  • Payroll Bookkeeper. Compile and post employee time and payroll data. May compute employees' time worked, production, and commission. May compute and post wages and deductions. May prepare paychecks.
  • Postal Clerk. Perform any combination of tasks in a post office, such as receive letters and parcels; sell postage and revenue stamps, postal cards, and stamped envelopes; fill out and sell money orders; place mail in pigeon holes of mail rack or in bags according to State, address, or other scheme; and examine mail for correct postage.
  • Procurement Clerk. Compile information and records to draw up purchase orders for procurement of materials and services.
  • Receptionist. Answer inquiries and obtain information for general public, customers, and other interested parties. Provide information regarding activities conducted at establishment; location of departments, offices, and employees within organization.
  • Secretary. Perform routine clerical and administrative functions such as drafting correspondence, scheduling appointments, organizing and maintaining paper and electronic files, or providing information to callers.
  • Statement Clerk. Prepare and distribute bank statements to customers, answer inquiries, and reconcile discrepancies in records and accounts.
  • Statistical Clerk. Compile and compute data according to statistical formulas for use in statistical studies. May perform actuarial computations and compile charts and graphs for use by actuaries. Includes actuarial clerks.
  • Store Clerk. Receive, store, and issue sales floor merchandise. Stock shelves, racks, and tables with merchandise and arrange merchandise displays to attract customers. May periodically take physical count of stock or check and mark merchandise.
  • Typist. Type letters, reports, or other material from rough draft, corrected copy, or voice recording. May perform other clerical duties as assigned.
  • Weighter. Weigh, measure, and check materials, supplies, and equipment for the purpose of keeping relevant records. Duties are primarily clerical by nature.

EDUCATIONAL OPPORTUNITIES: Office Clerk Training

Heald College-Roseville - Roseville, CA

Heald College-Roseville, Seven Sierra Gate Plz, Roseville, CA 95678. Heald College-Roseville is a small college located in Roseville, California. It is a private for-profit school with primarily 2-year programs and has 736 students. Heald College-Roseville has a less than one year program in General Office Occupations and Clerical Services.

Charles A. Jones Skills and Business Education Center - Sacramento, CA

Charles A. Jones Skills and Business Education Center, 5451 Lemon Hill Ave, Sacramento, CA 95824-1529. Charles A. Jones Skills and Business Education Center is a small school located in Sacramento, California. It is a public school with primarily 2-year programs and has 3,429 students. Charles A. Jones Skills and Business Education Center has a less than one year program in General Office Occupations and Clerical Services which graduated 157 students in 2008.

CERTIFICATIONS

Certified Associate in Project Management: As project management grows in scope, importance and recognition, so do the related career and credential options available to you.

For more information, see the Project Management Institute website.

LOCATION INFORMATION: Roseville, California

Roseville, California
Roseville, California photo by J.smith

Roseville is located in Placer County, California. It has a population of over 112,660, which has grown by 41.0% over the last ten years. The cost of living index in Roseville, 94, is below the national average. New single-family homes in Roseville cost $229,400 on average, which is far less than the state average. In 2008, six hundred seventy-six new homes were built in Roseville, down from 1,050 the previous year.

The three most popular industries for women in Roseville are health care, educational services, and public administration. For men, it is construction, public administration, and computer and electronic products. The average commute to work is about 26 minutes. More than 31.4% of Roseville residents have a bachelor's degree, which is higher than the state average. The percentage of residents with a graduate degree, 9.8%, is higher than the state average.

The unemployment rate in Roseville is 11.7%, which is less than California's average of 12.3%.

The percentage of Roseville residents that are affiliated with a religious congregation, 37.2%, is less than both the national and state average. Faith Chapel Assembly of God Church, Bethel Lutheran Church and First Baptist Church of Roseville are all churches located in Roseville. The largest religious groups are the Catholic Church, the LDS (Mormon) Church and the Southern Baptist Convention.

Roseville is home to the Diamond K Ranch and the Sierra View Country Club as well as Crestmont Park and Maidu Park. Shopping malls in the area include Roseville Square Shopping Center, Roseville Shopping Center and Bel Air Shopping Center. Visitors to Roseville can choose from Best Western Roseville Inn and Bridges at Woodcreek Oaks for temporary stays in the area.