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Career and Education Opportunities for Nuclear Medical Technologists in Arkansas

Arkansas has a population of 2,889,450, which has grown by 8.08% in the last 10 years. Nicknamed the "Natural State," Arkansas's capital and biggest city is Little Rock.

Currently, 150 people work as nuclear medical technologists in Arkansas. This is expected to grow by 20% to 190 people by 2016. This is better than the nation as a whole, where employment opportunities for nuclear medical technologists are expected to grow by about 16.3%. In general, nuclear medical technologists prepare, administer, and measure radioactive isotopes in therapeutic, diagnostic, and tracer studies utilizing a variety of radioisotope equipment.

A person working as a nuclear medical technologist can expect to earn about $30 per hour or $63,080 yearly on average in Arkansas and about $32 per hour or $66,660 yearly on average in the U.S. as a whole. Incomes for nuclear medical technologists are not quite as good as in the overall category of Radiology in Arkansas, and not quite as good as the overall Radiology category nationally. People working as nuclear medical technologists can fill a number of jobs, such as: nuclear cardiology technologist, radioisotope technician, and registered nuclear medicine technologist.

In 2008, there were a total of 1,599,446 jobs in Arkansas. The average annual income was $32,257 in 2008, up from $31,517 the preceding year. The unemployment rate in Arkansas was 7.3% in 2009, which has grown by 2.1% since the previous year. About 16.7% of Arkansas residents have college degrees, which is lower than the national average.

The top industries in Arkansas include poultry processing, hardware, and plumbing equipment merchant wholesalers, and ventilation, heating, air-conditioning, and commercial refrigeration equipment manufacturing. Notable tourist attractions include the Hendershott Museum Consultants Inc, the Museum of Discovery, and the Macarthur Museum of Arkansas Military History.

CITIES WITH Nuclear Medical Technologist OPPORTUNITIES IN Arkansas


JOB DESCRIPTION: Nuclear Medical Technologist

Nuclear Medical Technologist video from the State of New Jersey Dept. of Labor and Workforce Development

In general, nuclear medical technologists prepare, administer, and measure radioactive isotopes in therapeutic, diagnostic, and tracer studies utilizing a variety of radioisotope equipment. They also prepare stock solutions of radioactive materials and calculate doses to be administered by radiologists.

Every day, nuclear medical technologists are expected to be able to listen to and understand others in meetings. They need to articulate ideas and problems.

Similar jobs with educational opportunities in Arkansas include:

  • Cardiac Technician. Conduct tests on pulmonary or cardiovascular systems of patients for diagnostic purposes. May conduct or assist in electrocardiograms, cardiac catheterizations, pulmonary-functions, lung capacity, and similar tests.
  • Dental Hygienist. Clean teeth and examine oral areas, head, and neck for signs of oral disease. May educate patients on oral hygiene, take and develop X-rays, or apply fluoride or sealants.
  • Medical Laboratory Technician. Perform routine medical laboratory tests for the diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of disease. May work under the supervision of a medical technologist.
  • Pharmacist. Compound and dispense medications following prescriptions issued by physicians, dentists, or other authorized medical practitioners.
  • Radiation Therapist. Provide radiation therapy to patients as prescribed by a radiologist according to established practices and standards. Duties may include reviewing prescription and diagnosis; acting as liaison with physician and supportive care personnel; preparing equipment, such as immobilization, treatment, and protection devices; and maintaining records, reports, and files. May assist in dosimetry procedures and tumor localization.
  • Radiological Technician. Maintain and use equipment and supplies necessary to demonstrate portions of the human body on x-ray film or fluoroscopic screen for diagnostic purposes.
  • Radiology Technologist. Take x-rays and Computerized Axial Tomography (CAT or CT) scans or administer nonradioactive materials into patient's blood stream for diagnostic purposes. Includes technologists who specialize in other modalities, such as computed tomography, ultrasound, and magnetic resonance.

LOCATION INFORMATION: Arkansas

Arkansas
Arkansas photo by Vsmith

Arkansas has a population of 2,889,450, which has grown by 8.08% over the past decade. Nicknamed the "Natural State," Arkansas's capital and biggest city is Little Rock. In 2008, there were a total of 1,599,446 jobs in Arkansas. The average annual income was $32,257 in 2008, up from $31,517 the previous year. The unemployment rate in Arkansas was 7.3% in 2009, which has grown by 2.1% since the previous year. Approximately 16.7% of Arkansas residents have college degrees, which is lower than the national average.

The top industries in Arkansas include poultry processing, hardware, and plumbing equipment merchant wholesalers, and ventilation, heating, air-conditioning, and commercial refrigeration equipment manufacturing. Notable tourist destinations include the Museum of Discovery, the Macarthur Museum of Arkansas Military History, and the Quapaw Quarter Association.