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Career and Education Opportunities for Environmental Health and Safety Specialists in Alaska

Alaska has a population of 698,473, which has grown by 11.41% over the past 10 years. Nicknamed the "Great Land," its capital is Juneau, though its most populous city is Anchorage.

There is a wide variety of career and education opportunities for environmental health and safety specialists in the Anchorage, Alaska area. There are currently 650 jobs for environmental health and safety specialists in Alaska and this is projected to grow 20% to 780 jobs by 2016. This is not quite as good as the national trend for environmental health and safety specialists, which sees this job pool growing by about 27.9% over the next eight years. In general, environmental health and safety specialists conduct research or perform investigation for the purpose of identifying, abating, or eliminating sources of pollutants or hazards that affect either the environment or the health of the population.

Environmental health and safety specialists earn about $29 hourly or $60,750 per year on average in Alaska and about $28 per hour or $59,750 annually on average nationally. Earnings for environmental health and safety specialists are not quite as good as earnings in the general category of Physical Sciences in Alaska and not quite as good as general Physical Sciences category earnings nationally. People working as environmental health and safety specialists can fill a number of jobs, such as: clinical laboratory scientist, water quality analyst, and environmental health specialist.

There are four schools of higher education in the Anchorage area, including one within twenty-five miles of Anchorage where you can get a degree to start your career as an environmental health and safety specialist. Given that the most common education level for environmental health and safety specialists is a Bachelor's degree, you can expect to spend about four years training to become an environmental health and safety specialist if you already have a high school diploma.

In 2008, there were a total of 452,986 jobs in Alaska. The average annual income was $43,922 in 2008, up from $41,081 in 2007. The unemployment rate in Alaska was 8.0% in 2009, which has grown by 1.5% since the previous year. Roughly 24.7% of Alaska residents have college degrees, which is higher than the national average.

The top industries in Alaska include oil extraction, transportation, and general merchandise stores. Notable tourist destinations include the Oscar Anderson House Museum, the Anchorage Historic Properties Inc, and the Alaska Museum of Natural History.

CITIES WITH Environmental Health and Safety Specialist OPPORTUNITIES IN Alaska


JOB DESCRIPTION: Environmental Health and Safety Specialist

Environmental Health and Safety Specialist video from the State of New Jersey Dept. of Labor and Workforce Development

In general, environmental health and safety specialists conduct research or perform investigation for the purpose of identifying, abating, or eliminating sources of pollutants or hazards that affect either the environment or the health of the population. They also utilizing knowledge of various scientific disciplines may collect, synthesize, and take action based on data derived from measurements or observations of air, food, and other sources.

Every day, environmental health and safety specialists are expected to be able to articulate ideas and problems. They need to listen to and understand others in meetings. It is also important that they read and understand documents and reports.

Similar jobs with educational opportunities in Alaska include:

  • Biologist. Research or study basic principles of plant and animal life, such as origin, relationship, and functions.
  • Chemist. Conduct qualitative and quantitative chemical analyses or chemical experiments in laboratories for quality or process control or to develop new products or knowledge.
  • Forester. Manage forested lands for economic, recreational, and conservation purposes. May inventory the type, amount, and location of standing timber, appraise the timber's worth, negotiate the purchase, and draw up contracts for procurement. May determine how to conserve wildlife habitats, creek beds, and soil stability, and how best to comply with environmental regulations. May devise plans for planting and growing new trees, monitor trees for healthy growth, and determine the best time for harvesting. Develop forest management plans for public and privately-owned forested lands.
  • Geological Specialist. Study the composition, structure, and other physical aspects of the earth. May use geological, physics, and mathematics knowledge in exploration for oil, gas, or underground water; or in waste disposal, land reclamation, or other environmental problems. May study the earth's internal composition, atmospheres, and its magnetic, electrical, and gravitational forces. Includes mineralogists, crystallographers, and seismologists.
  • Hydrologist. Research the distribution, circulation, and physical properties of underground and surface waters; study the form and intensity of precipitation, its rate of infiltration into the soil, movement through the earth, and its return to the ocean and atmosphere.
  • Soil Conservation Technician. Plan and develop coordinated practices for soil erosion control, soil and water conservation, and sound land use.

LOCATION INFORMATION: Alaska

Alaska
Alaska photo by Christy747

Alaska has a population of 698,473, which has grown by 11.41% in the last 10 years. Nicknamed the "Great Land," its capital is Juneau, though its biggest city is Anchorage. In 2008, there were a total of 452,986 jobs in Alaska. The average annual income was $43,922 in 2008, up from $41,081 the previous year. The unemployment rate in Alaska was 8.0% in 2009, which has grown by 1.5% since the previous year. About 24.7% of Alaska residents have college degrees, which is higher than the national average.

The top industries in Alaska include oil extraction, transportation, and general merchandise stores. Notable tourist destinations include the The Imaginarium, the Anchorage Historic Properties Inc, and the Exhibit Support.